Main Line Winawer g

1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 b4 4 e5 c5 5 a3 xc3+ 6 bxc3 foel 7 4 0-0 (D) This simple method of preventing xg7 has now become more popular than 7 c7. Not long ago, one could have this as a useful sideline to avoid masses of theory but the last 10-15 years have seen a vast investigation of this line. Black seems to be castling straight into a menacing-looking attack but his counterchances (usually based on f6 or f5, or counterplay against White's centre) shouldn't be underestimated. In the 'early' days...

Armenian Variation a

1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 > c3 b4 4 e5 c5 5 a3 a5 (T> ) Retreating the bishop to a5 rather than giving it up for the knight on c3 is an attractive idea. Both approaches have sound positional ideas but I like the idea of keeping the bishop - as long as it works tactically. It has been dubbed the Armenian Variation due to the great impact Grandmasters Vaganian and Lputian have had in developing this line. Although Botvinnik used it three times in his 1954 World Championship match against Smyslov (+1,...

Psi

This has become more popular over the years. Korchnoi favours it, which of course counts for something. Black's idea is to avoid weakening the king-side too much, advance on the queen-side and at a suitable moment try to rescue his king, which also frees the h8-rook. I am not sure what is White's most exact move. Much depends on the setup White is aiming for, since he has a number of slightly different attacking schemes. With the text-move, White introduces the idea of bringing the rook onto...

Burn Variation jbcf

1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 < > c3 < > f6 4 gS dxe4 5 < > xe4 e7 6 xf6 xf6 (DJ At the time of writing, at elite level, this is an immensely popular line of the Burn Variation. The positions arising lead to interesting strategic battles where White gets a chance for a king-side attack if Black doesn't play actively enough. On the other hand, if Black does manage to create counter-play, his chances are excellent. Now we look at A 7 0-0 58 B 7 5M7 61 The two might transpose to each other but...

G

8 < 4> f8 is probably best met by 9 dl, although 9 c4 10 dxc5 Wxc2 11 Osf3 > xe5 12 Wg3, Vogt-Kri-voshei, Leutersdorf 1998, also looks interesting. White has good compensation. 9 Vdl (D) A typical manoeuvre. White has induced weaknesses on Black's kingside and does not mind the wasted tempi. This is much safer than 9 cxd4 10 Sbl d3 11 xd3 Wxa3 12 rf3 Wc5 13 h4 h6 14 0-0 > d7 15 Sei, when White was better in Anand-P.Nikolic, Groningen FIDE 1997. The immediate 10 jta6 is also interesting....

Cxd

A In such situations Black would usually consider 8 c4 but here White obtains too much play on the kingside. 9 3 10 g4 was very good for White in Anand-Morozevich, Frankfurt rpd 2000. b On 8 b4, Shirov gives 9 axb4 cxb4 10 as better for White, which seems right because White has good chances on the kingside. Incidentally, 9 dxc5 might also be an idea, intending to meet 9 bxa3 with 10 b4 . c Instead, 8 a5 is logical. Then 9 amp f3 Aa6 10 h4 b4 11 h5 Ae7 12 f5 exf5 13 hg3 xfl 14 lt 4 gt xfl...