Hunt Variation ic

White can also play 5 d4, but Black has nothing to fear after 5 ... b6 or 5... d6 6cded7 £>f3 Ae7 8 £c3 (Sveshnikov-Shamkovich, Hastings 1977-8) 8 ... de 9 £xe5 Jie6 10 £d3 £d7 =, or 7 ... de 8 £>xd5 Ab4+ 9 Ad2 0-0 = Szeles-Kneievic, Keszthely 1981.

In the opinion of the authors, this is Black's best reply. Black should not part with his outpost so early in the game: 5 ... £>xc3 6 dc! d6 7 cd ed 8 Jic4 Jiel 9 Af4!

puts Black under considerable pressure, Krogius-A.Zaitsev, USSR 1971, continued 9... de 10 Axe50-0 11 «xd8 Axd8 12 Ag413 0-0-0 £d7 14 Af4 £b6 15 Ab3, and now Black could have limited the damage with 15 ... 2c8, but White is still clearly better after 16 Shel.

A great deal of theory has been built up around 5 ... e6, and this is Black's playable alternative. 6 JLc4 transposes to material considered under the move order 5 jLc4. Other tries:

a) 6 d4 d6 7 cd cd 8 &f3 £ic6 leads to a solid variation of the Sicilian Defence.

b) 6 «g4 h5! 7 #c4 ¡h\c3 brings Black equality after 8 ... d6 no matter how White recaptures.

c) 6 £xd5 ed 7 d4 d6 8 cd cd 9 £>f3 £>c6 10 jLe2 (best here, to avoid the pin with 10... Ag4) 10... de! 11 de (11 £xe5 Ab4+ 12 £d2 «b6 = Voskanin-Schmit, USSR 1975) 11 ... Ab4+ 12 Ad2 «a5 = Siaperas-Flatov, Lugano Ol 1968.

6 ic4

White can continue his develop ment with 6 £>f3, but after 6 ... d6 matters come to a head in the centre: 1 faxd5 cd 8 cd ed and now Black has a good game, e.g. 9 fac6\ 10 Ab5 Ae7 11 «xd5 0-0, Sikora-Alburt, Decin 1977, or 9 d4 fac6 10 i.e2 with equality, Sikora-Ghinda, Warsaw Z 1979.

7 cd

If White captures with the other pawn, Black finesses quick equality: 7 ed £>xc3! 8 dc ed 9 cd Axd6. The pawn is poisoned, of course: 7 <Sxd5 cd 8 £xd5 e6 9 Af3 de 10 b4 e4! and White is in deep trouble.

7 Wb3 leads to complicated positions, but Black's chances are no worse after either 7 ... de 8 faxd5 cd 9 Axd5 e6 10 Axb7 Axb7 11 #xb7 «d5!,Sveshnikov-Palatnik, USSR 1974, or 7 ... fadlll 8 £ixd5 JLxc5! 9 fac7+ st?d7 10 H»e3 &xc7 11 d4 Ae6!, which led to unclear positions in Kislova-Levitina, Italy 1972:

12 b3 d5 13 Ae2 fad! 14 f4, although Black is no worse. This is better than 8 cd £>xe5 9 £>xd5 cd 10 JLxd5 e6 with a better game for Black. Bagirov's 10 ... Wd6 is also good.

8 Wb3 led to an equal game in Platonov-Kneievic, Kiev 1978: 8 ... de 9 £ixd5 cd 10 Axd5 Wc7.

Not 8 ... JLg4?! 9 £ixd5! cd 10 jLxd5 and the pawn on b7 is loose^

9 0-0 faxc3

9... £>b6 led to an advantage for White in Mechkarov-Suba, Bankya 1977: 10 Ab3 0-0 11 d4 £>a6 12 Af4.

10 dc

If White tries to build a strong pawn centre with 10 be and later d4, Black will be able to strike quickly with ... c5 and queenside expansion.

The game is level.

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment