Xyh

The exchange of knights is advantageous, in principle. The rook does not occupy a significant position in the centre, the pressure on the e6 pawn is relieved and it will now be easier to play b7-b5. There is one aspect to the position of the rook which is favourable, however, and that is that White will now have an extremely dangerous threat in e4-e5, as the rook will then be able to move over to h4. Only the most precise defence can neutralise this threat. If one is going to exchange the...

Classical Scheveningen with h or Af

Klovan Platonov

In this chapter we examine the position after 1 e4 c5 2 gt f3 e6 3 d4 cd 4 amp xd4 gt f6 5 lt E c3 d6 6 Ae2 a6 7 0-0 amp e7 8 f4 0-0 where White does not play 9 Ae3. We ought to point out that it is also possible to fianchetto the queen's bishop. This plan is discussed in the introduction to the Modern Scheveningen, Chapter 10. A 9i h1 B 9Af3 A When the bishop is left on c1, this move becomes not merely a prophylactic, but a necessity, avoiding pins along the a7-g1 diagonal. Now Black has to...

AmAmt m

Not wasting any time, White will push forward the g-pawn and prepare the way for the manoeuvre gg1-g3-h3. Now Black can also defend by transferring his knight to c5, but after 11 gt d7 12 g4 b5 we reach a position which is examined in C. a 15 h4 b4 16 gt a4 Ab7 17 g6 hg 18 h5 e5 Zuckerman-Paoli, 1970. b 15 g3 ge8 16 h5 g6 17 h4 b4 18 ce2 Ab7 19 gh3 c 15 h5 g6 16 h6 e8 17 gg3 Af8 18 h4 b4 18 Agl 19 Sh3 Qf8 20 e5 d5 19 ce2 Ab7 20 gh3 h5 21 ig3 Ag7. d 15 f4 b4 15 ge8 16 amp f5 lt Sc5 It is too...

Xfr

A new, and as yet untried continuation. Black hasputhiskingaway and now opens up the centre, in order to give hisbishopssomethingto do. He knowingly weakens the Pd6, considering the corresponding weakness of the Pe4 to be sufficient 10 Qf5 is not good 10 amp xe4 11 xe7 xe7 12 gt xe4 ef. 10 4 xc6 be 11 fe de leads to an equal position, since the weaknesses of the Pc6 and Pe4 are identical. The move 10 b3 deserves attention, though, as it cuts off the effect of the occupation of g4 by Black's...

Exa

An immediate pawn storm would be much too slow and would provide Black with time for the creation of counterplay on the queenside 13 h4 b5 and now a 14 f3 Ad 7 15 g2 b4 16 ce2 amp xb3 17 ab a5 18 g6 fg 19 h5 4 xd4 20 gt xd4 g5 21 Axg5 Axg5 22 xg5 h6 23 g4 Sf7 24 Shg1 a4 Fischer-Larsen, 1970. b 14 amp b1 amp xb3 14 b4 15 id5 ed 16 4 xc6 ixb3 17 xb4 ic5 18 gt xd5 b7 19 Ad4 Ae6 20 45f6 15 ab Ad7 16 h5 ixd4 17 xd4 Ac6 18 g6 fg 19 hg h6 20 gt d5 ed 21 ed Ae8 22 Axh6 Axg6 with a sharp game,...

Classical Scheveningen Introduction

1 e4 c5 2 gt f3 e6 3 d4 cd 4 Qxd4 4 f6 5 c3 d6 6 Ae2 Among chessplayers who are only superficially acquainted with the theory of the Sicilian Defence, there exists the opinion that this modest move leads to less interesting play than 6 g4 or 6 Ac4. Not so The system with 6 e2 may not be quite so direct, but it is more solid and no less exciting than other lines of the Scheveningen. Double-edged play is unavoidable, and sacrifices or counter-sacrifices abound, since White is gunning for the...

Info

White has an advantage in space and holds the initiative, but as Hort-Andersson, 1973, shows, the battle lies ahead 13 b1 b4 14 amp a4 b7 15b3. a dangerous weapon against the Scheveningen system of the Sicilian Defence. It requires boldness, enterprising play and exactitude from both sides attack and defence. 1 e4 c5 2 gt f3 e6 3 d4 cd 4 amp xd4 gt f6 5 amp c3d6 In this chapter we will consider three systems where opposite side castling is employed, in which White plays f2-f4 later than move 6....