F iii man stalemating positions

White to move: stalemate

White to move: stalemate

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White is not in checkmate but has no legal moves. On cl or c] he would be in check to the pawn. On c2 or e2 he would be on an adjacent square (and in check) to the king. This is stalemate.

White to move: stalemate

Here any move by White would put him in check to the queen. Despite Black's clear material advantage, the result is a draw by stalemate.

Black to move: stalemate

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This is another case in which a player cannot benefit from material advantage. Black has no legal move, so the result is a stalemate.

Black to move: stalemate

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Knight and king against lone king is always a draw, with no checkmating possible. As here, the likely outcome is stalemate.

Black to move; stalemate

Black to move; stalemate

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King and pawn against lone king is a common endgame and can produce checkmate, but the endgame must be correctly played. If Black is allowed to get his king to the promotion square (i.e., the square on which the advancing pawn would become a queen), a lone defending king can always draw against king and a-pawn or king and b-pawn.

White to move: stalemate

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There are checkmate positions in the endgame of king and two knights versus lone king, but only if the defending side plays incorrectly. Here Black has hemmed in the white king so it cannot move. As a result, the position is a draw hy stalemate. This is the best the stronger side can achieve, if the weaker side defends correctly.

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