Development Of The Soviet School

The history of Soviet chess can be divided into four periods. First period 1917 to 1925. The Great October Socialist Revolution of 1917 brought cultural activities within the reach of the masses. These were years of a search for new organizational forms of the chess movement the movement was taken up by the trade unions, the Young Communist League, the Army and the Navy. In October 1920, in time of war, the First All-Russian Chess Olympiad, in effect the first Soviet championship, was held in...

Vladimir Makogonov

Vladimir Makogonov (born 1904), a mathematics teacher by profession, won a name for himself in trade-union tournaments and city championships in Baku. He made his debut in a U.S.S.R. championship in 1927, together with Botvinnik, and won the title of Master. Working hard over the years, he steadily improved his game. Makogonov has competed in the finals of many U.S.S.R. pham-pionships. His best performances have been fourth place in 1937, a tie for fourth in 1939, and a tie for fifth in 1944....

Name Index

Alatortsev 55, 90, 91, 94, 95, 98, 100, 101, 133, 134, 180, 272-274, 279, 280, 291, 334, 340, 349-351, 368 Alekhine 11, 36-52, 62, 64, 68, 70, 83, 98. 105, 110, 116, 117, 119, 121, 126, 179, 195, 202, 203, 238, 280, 301, 304, 306, 320, 330, 333, 334 Anderson 176 Antoshin 176, 334 Aramanovich 143 Aratovsky 297 Aronin 96, 103, 274-277, 324 Averbakh 96, 99. 108, 109, 155-160, 208, 218-220, 240 Baine 372, 373 Bannik 264, 290, 291 Barcza 216-218, 256 Bastrikov 91 Baturin sky 334-336 Bek_255 90, 92,...

Yury Averbakh

In 1938, the year Vasily Smyslov won the U.S.S.R. junior championship, another young player to come into the limelight was Yurv Aver-bakh, who captured first place in a U.S.S.R. schoolboys' tournament and won first-cate-gory rating. He was 15 years old at that time. Yury Averbakh earned his initial category rating when in the fourth grade of secondary school. Soon after, he began attending the chess club at the Young Pioneers' Stadium and then the club in the Moscow House of Young Pioneers....

Game Index

Botvinnik 133 Chekhover 279 Lyublinsky 273 Yudovich 349 Averbakh Gligoric 156 Kotov 218 Pan-no 158 Belavenets Rabinovich I. 66 Veresov 73 Boleslavsky Bondarevsky 163 Makogonov 161 Szabo 166 Bondarevsky Anderson 176 Boleslavsky 163 Gerstenfeld 173 Gligoric 175 Kotov 169 Lisitsyn 172 Pa-nov 170 Smyslov 174 Ufim-tsev 170 Botvinnik Alatortsev 133 Capablanca 122, 129 Keres 130, 134 Le-venfish 134 Lilienthal 233 Mikenas 136 Rabinovich 127 Rauzer 128 Romanovsky 131, 336 Smyslov 135, 143, 152 Unzicker...

Rashid Nezhmetdinov

The title of Master commands honour and respect in the U.S.S.R. The Soviet master combines theoretical knowledge with practical skill and research ability. He strives to promote chess and to uphold the leading position occupied by the Soviet school. High standards are set masters. All the more credit, in view of this, goes to Rashid Nezhmetdinov, champion of the Tatar Republic, who holds the honour of being the Soviet Union's only master in both chess and draughts. Rashid Nezhmetdinov was born...

RQ

Now comes a graceful five-move manoeuvre. Until now White was making the only possible moves. If now 27 Q B3, then 27 Q R2ch 28 Q B2, QxQ 29 RxQ, B Kt3, winning the exchange. Not taking the false path 28 Q K5 29 B Q3, Q K4 30 P Kt4, B Kt4 31 K Rl, B K6 32 Q-Kl, and White is saved. The problem-like manoeuvre resulted in the gain of the exchange for Black, and on the 58th move he won, despite Lasker's tenacious de gt fence. From that time on Ragozin's combinative talent enjoyed universal...

Sicilian Defence

Bringing out the Queen so soon is unwise. Better is 8 . B Q2, with a view to Kt B3. A deep and ingenious manoeuvre, laying the foundation for a vigorous attack on the K-side. The natural developing moves 9 B K.2 or 9 B Q3 do not cause Black any serious difficulties. After 8 . . . Q B2 a more logical move is 9 Kt B3 or even 9 QKt Q2. A tempting move is 11 Kt K4, but White can reply to that with 12 Q R3 with dangerous threats on the K-side. A mistake. Better is 12 . P KR4, with the further...

Chess Literature

The history of Russian chess literature begins with A Description of Chinese Chess 1775 by A. Leontiev, Secretary of the Russian Embassy in Peking. This book reflected the interest shown by Russian players in chess in other countries, great China in particular. What lends Leontiev's book added significance is the fact that it gives the Russian names of all the pieces. As Chigorin noted in the magazine Shakhmatny Listok this book is the earliest monument of Russian chess terminology that has...

Tigran Petrosyan

Hard work often leads to amazing progress in a short space of time. That was the case with Tigran Petrosvan. In 1951 and 1952, that is, in little more than a year, this gifted player succeeded, by dint of persistent effort, in advancing from a rank-and-file Master to a leading International Grandmaster. Tigran Petrosyan was born in a working-class family in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, in 1929. He learned chess as a youth and quickly moved up the classification ladder. He confirmed his rank...

Kira Zvorykina

When Kira Zvorykina was 16 she won first place in one of the tournaments the members of her family held from time to time. This victory over her constant rivals filled her with confidence, and she decided to enter school tournaments. To her surprise, she found she could make a good showing against her school champions and in inter-school tournaments. She learned a great deal from classes at the chess club of the Leningrad Palace of Young Pioneers. Lectures by Pyotr Romanov-sky cleared up many...

Valentina Borisenko

Valentina Borisenko nee Belova was born in the town of Cherepovets in 1920. Her father was a doctor. She learned chess while a high-school student in Leningrad, and in 1937 made her debut in the semi-final of the city tournament for the women's championship. She showed exceptional persistence in studying theory and playing in strong tournaments she acquired valuable experience from the defeats she sustained at the beginning. A fearless, industrious player, she won second-category rating in a...

Vasily Smyslov

When it was announced that Vasily Smyslov, then a 17-year-old schoolboy, would compete in the Moscow Championship of 1938, the news did not arouse a stir. None of the masters considered him a dangerous rival. But as the tournament progressed, increasing attention was focussed on Smyslov. What was surprising was not only his victories over strong and experienced opponents, but his style. He plunged confidently into combinational and positional play, was proficient in the technique of exploiting...

Pqr

R Ktl, also preparing for P QKt4 and removing the Black has to preserve his King Bishop from being exchanged after 11 B R6 , for it plays an important part in the defence of his King and in the organization of offensive operations on the Q-side. Black counters White's swift attack on the K-side by pushing ahead on the Q-side. Positions of this type are always very acute and demand great precision. A cool defence. 18 . . . PxP is weaker, for then 19 Kt Q5 and...