Ag Bc

9 cd (actually Kasparov's suggestion) 10 4jxd4 J xg2 11 xg2 Ae7 12 Sdl 0-0 13 c3 Sc8 14 a4 t> 6, as in Opocensky-Prukha, CSSR1945, where 'White can hardly count on an advantage'. Kasparov considers this dubious. There are two other ways to recapture (a) 10 xf6 11 c3 is better for White, for example 11 il.e7 12 e4 0-0 13 d5 . (b) 10 gf 11 dc (Spiridonov) 11 ilxc5 12 h4 is unclear, but 11 4ljc3 b5 12 d3 c4 13 c2 b4 is no more clear, Inkiov-Pinter, Zagreb IZ 1987. 11 b5 12 cb AxO 13 a4+...

Cd

If White does not wish to give up the bishop pair then he can play 6 Ah4, but after 6 xc3 7 be dc Black has a good game, for example (a) 8 e3 Ae6 9 Ae2 (9 gbl b6 10 Sd2 0-011 xc4 d5 12 d2 d7 13 a3 c5 14 O a4 Mecking-Fischer, Buenos Aires 1970) 9 0-0 10 0-0 d7 11 g5 Ad5 12 e4 h6 13 ed hg 14 Jlxg5 b6 15 d2 ge8 16 Ah6 Af6 Groszpeter-Ftacnik, Trnava 1983. (b) 8 a4+ mi 9 xc4 b6 10 e3 Aa6 11 m3 Axfl 12 < S> xfl c5 13 < S> e2 cd 14 cd ic6 15 ghdl 0-0 16 gacl gac8 Foisor-W. Schmidt, Polanica...

Spanish

Kasparov played the Spanish game a bit in his early years, but put it aside until 1985, when he started to play it for both sides. At the Hilversum match against Timman, co-author Schiller asked him how he had managed to absorb all of the theory so quickly as to be able to employ it in serious play. He replied that it was not necessary to know all of the latest moves in order to play the Spanish. An understanding of the underlying principles is sufficient, because the Spanish is primarily a...

G

Co-author Shamkovich proposes 12 lt S gt d2 , e.g. 12 fe 13 de g5 14 c2 f5 15 d3 xe6 16 f3 with a decisive attack, since 16 0-0 is met by 17 Ac4, and otherwise 17 Sel is coming It is possible, however, that recent developments may rehabilitate the line Another alternative is 14 ed JLxd7 15 Axd7 15 e2 tf8 16 M3 Se8 favours Black 15 xd7 16 g4 f5 Not 16 lt 8 gt d8 17 itg5 f6 18 0-0-0 Plaskett-Norwood, Chester 1983. 17 a4 lt S gt c8 18 Ae3 Axc3 18 Ah6 19 Axc5 g2 20 c4 with better chances for White...

Info

Been seen with some regularity, but both Kasparov and Tony Miles have been quite effective in dealing with it. 17 xf5 is the strongest move, and on 17 Ac8, then, with the brilliant 18 f4 Kasparov-Timman, Hilversum m 6 1985 saw 18 amp d4 ed 19 cd MS 20 e4 g6 21 c3 0-0 22 Sfe 1 kI7 23 e5 Ab7 24 Be3, but now with 24 Bae8 25 Bael de 26 de 4ic5 27 e6 Se7 the situation would be unclear, not much better for Black, as some authorities have claimed. White plays 28 JteS , e.g. 28 gt xe6 29 Ag3 or 29 de...

The Catalan

Kasparov adopted this opening for his match against Korchnoi during a period where Icelandic IM now GM Margeir Petursson was its leading exponent and when the literature on the opening included only an old book by Neishtadt and a small monograph in English by co-author Schiller. He retained the opening for occasional use against Karpov. Current recommended literature includes books by Neishtadt 1986 , Moiseyev amp Ravinsky 1984 and Schiller 1986, 1988 . Before the Korchnoi match he had used the...

A

This sensible move is practically forced d8 12 Crf3 0-0 13 0-0 Be8 14 c2 Cebalo-Lobron, Reggio Emilia 1985 86, and although perhaps Black is safe after 14 f6, e.g. 15 d2 Ah3, 15 f5 gf 16 ef g4 17 g5 leaves White with an advantage. b 9 gt a6 10 amp f3 gt c7 10 gt b4 led to a quick kill in Kasparov-Nunn, Lucerne 01. 1982 11 0-0 a6 12 Axd7 Axd7 13 f5 13 0-0 14 Ag5 f6 15 Af4 gf 16 Axd6 Axa4 17 Bxa4 xd6 18 h4 fe 19 d7 20 xe4 lt S gt h8 21 ixc5 1-0 11 0-0 11 Ae2 may be a significantly stronger move...

Modern Exchange Variation

Even a little bit of thought will suffice to demonstrate that no matter how one structures one's repertoire there must be at least one position which one must play for both sides. Perhaps the most prominent overlap in Kasparov's repertoire is the Griinfeld, which he has had to face frequently as White ever since taking up 1 d4, and which he now also plays as Black. Now if it were a simple matter for White to obtain an advantage against the Griinfeld, Kasparov would hardly make the defence his...

Grnfeld Defence Black

Kasparov adopted this opening for his 1986 match against Karpov. When it was first seen there was pandemonium in the press room. The opening became the centre of a theoretical debate in the third and fourth matches. In spite of failures in the first part of match III, Kasparov maintained his faith in the opening and it carried him to victory in both matches. Altogether, the matches saw 19 Griinfelds, applying a variety of systems. Kasparov also used the opening with success in games against...

The Petrosian System

The authors found the pamphlet Developments in the Orthodox Queen's Gambit 1984-1987 by Julian Way most helpful in compiling the relevant games for this chapter. All analysis is our own, unless otherwise indicated. Recently the World Champion has chosen another variation. Kasparov-Timman, Amsterdam 1988 1 d4 gt f6 2 c4 e6 3 gt 0 d5 4 gt c3 Ae7 5 Ag5 h6 6 amp xf6 Axf8 7 b3 c6 8 e3 0-0 9 Sdl b6 10 c2 dc 11 Axc4 c5 12 gt e4 amp e7 13 dc Axc5 14 0-0 amp e7 15 5.e2 Ad7 16 e5 Sc8 17 d3 Ae8 18 c4 c7...

The Botvinnik System

8 Ah4 g5 11 This position has been analyzed for years without a definitive conclusion being reached. Kasparov scored two impressive back-to-back victories in the 1981 USSR Ch. which seemed to bury the line for Black. A couple of years later I ES asked him if he thought the line was pretty much out of commission, and he expressed the