Symmetrical epawn Openings

Scotch Game Centre Game Ponziani Opening Ruy Lopez Opening Italian Game Two Knights Defence In this chapter we shall concentrate on the wide range of openings that can arise after the moves Putting a pawn in the centre where it controls some useful squares (namely d5 and f5) and immediately providing options for the queen and bishop. A blocker Black follows suit, thus receiving similar benefits. Let's start with one of the oldest openings, the Scotch Game. Developing a knight and attacking...

Alekhine Defence

Most as though the concept of advancing this pawn is temporarily forgotten and they prefer to defend the pawn passively. Of course 2 Nc3 is playable, but in order to continue in this manner, White would have to be prepared to play the Vienna Game, which would arise by transposition after 2 e5. The only good square for the knight. Whilst 2 Ng8 is safe, it's an obvious admission that Black has made a mistake. He must of course tread very carefully here. We have already seen how knights can end up...

English Opening

Not necessarily favoured by Englishmen Not necessarily favoured by Englishmen It is easy to be deceived by such tricky move orders and it pays to be on the ball. Here, for example, Black may have been unaware that he would be unable to play his favourite Grunfeld Defence. Sure, d2-d4 will follow, but it is too late for Black to get in d7-d5. A similar problem occurs with Nimzo-Indian players after l Nf6 2 Nc3 e6 3 e4 (Diagram 4) as 3 Bb4 would be a case of shutting the barn door after the horse...

Opening Fundamentals

The Basic Idea of the Opening Welcome to this book, in which I will be taking you through the chess openings of today and trying to explain to you why it is that theory is as it is. Throughout this book you will notice common themes regarding the explanation of most moves, and before we begin in earnest let me offer some general information regarding the early stages of a game. I know that you may have heard some of these tips before, but as far as I'm concerned, you can never be told them...

Modern Benoni

Black takes an immediate swipe at the white centre, confident that after 3 dxc5, he would regain this pawn. Indeed both 3 Na6 and 3 Qa5 would do the trick, whilst 3 e6 is also very sensible. White shouldn't give much thought to that con tinuation and although he could simply protect d4 with 3 Nf3 or 3 e3, it is more logical to advance the pawn to d5. This pawn break will guarantee a couple of half-open files. Instead, the Czech Benoni keeps things more blocked with 3 e5 as White won't want to...