Bxc

Recovers material and prepares to double Rooks on the half-open c-file leading to the white King. 15. h5 Rac8 (5) Black develops his last piece with increased pressure on the white King's position. 16. Nb3 Qc7 (5) Triples major pieces on the sensitive c-file. 16 Qa6 is less forceful, and 16 Qe5 becomes complicated after 17. f4- 17. hxg6 fxg6 (5) Keeps the h-file closed to protect the black King while developing a possible flight square (f7). 18. Kbl Be6 (5) Adds pressure toward the white King,...

Bb mate

These brief games illustrate how quickly opening mistakes can be punished. Avoid the 12 mistakes listed above, and you will play the opening well. Your knowledge of opening principles is now sufficient to ensure strong, competent opening play. But where will you begin Which of the chessmen at your disposal on the board will you select for your first move As we proceed to look at the array of choices before you, your own preferences and style of play will enable you to make that important...

Attacking The King

In chess, as in any conflict, success lies in attack. Checkmating attacks are a frequent and critical feature of middlegames. Generally, your King must he safe and your position secure before embarking on an attack. Attacks against the enemy King are justified only by existing or potential weaknesses in the opponent's position. Be prepared to attack your opponent's King under these conditions Enemy King is exposed or restricted Several of your pieces are near, or aimed at, the opposing King Few...

Summary

The middlegame is the most important often critical and difficult phase of chess. Most chess games are decided in the middlegame by checkmating attacks and decisive tactics. Eight essential keys to effective middlegame play are 2. Building a superior position early 4- Recognizing, creating, and attacking opponents' weaknesses with effective tactics 5. Attacking the enemy King when justified 6. Improving your own position constantly, including keeping 7. Using sound and flexible planning short-...

Combinations And Sacrifices

No chessman is sacred, except the King. Strong chessplayers seldom allow opponents to play simple, direct tactics to checkmate or win material instead, winning tactics must usually he forced or induced. Combinations and sacrifices frequently provide the answer. A combination is a series of forcing moves, often involving a temporary sacrifice of material, which leads to a tactical or positional advantage. The result of a successful combination may range from checkmate to a small positional...

Kg one last step Rh checkmate

For a final example of a well-conceived attack against a King castled on the opposite wing, examine Diagram 109 The first obvious IDEAL MATE is white Q g7 supported by the white B h6, black K g8. However, if I. Qxd4 (threatening 2. Qg7 mate), Qf6 thwarts White's attack. Theretore, another IDEAL MATE must be developed. White visualized a second IDEAL MATE white Q h8, white R h7, black K f7 (forced there by a white Queen-check onh8). White defined his tasks to reach the IDEAL MATE as Move the...

Nxd

Consistently asking and correctly answering the previous FOUR KEY QUESTIONS will enable you to avoid fatal mistakes and recognize winning opportunities. Remember the three general situations which may exist after your opponent's last move 2. Opponent made no threat and has weaknesses 3. Opponent made no threat and has no weaknesses Defining which type of position exists will help narrow your search for the best move, as schematically illustrated in the following flow chart.

Info

White is five points ahead in material (Bishop and Knight for a pawn) and has an imposing lead in development and safe King position, while the black King is restricted and cannot castle. White clearly stands better and has a winning position. (White's material advantage and strong attacking position, combined with Black's immobile King, led to a successful checkmating attack in 12 moves, beginning with 1. Ncxb5 c6 2. Nd6t). When analyzing a position, it is often helpful to minimize the...

Chess Notation Bc

White saw an opportunity to expose the black King and follow up with tactical threats. So White boldly played 4. Bxf7f and after 4 Kxf7 5. Qf3f threatened the black N e4. Black retreated 5 Nf6 to save his Knight and interpose against check, and White continued 6. dxe5, threatening the pinned N f6. White's sacrifice appears to be paying off, as he threatens to regain his piece in a favorable position. However, this position is as far as White had calculated, and Black resourcefully responded 6...