Ft g

WAife 10 Ml*

No captures have been made in the last four moves. It is White's move. What was the last move?

* The first four problems were all composed by Moriarty before the age of nine—this one, which was Moriarty's first, was composed at the age of seven. Simple as it is, it certainly shows remarkable precocity.

White 3

Neither the White king nor queen has moved during the last five moves, nor has any piece been captured during that time. What was the last move?

White 3 M3

No pawn has moved, nor has any piece been captured, in the last five moves. The Black king has been accidentally knocked off the board. On what square should he stand?

* For a child of eight, this is quite ingenious!

The Black king has never moved nor been in check. White gave Black odds of a piece, not a pawn. What odds did White give?

None of the royalty has yet moved. A Prove that if there are no promoted White pieces on the board, then one of the four knights has moved. B Prove also that if there are no promoted Black pieces on the board, then two of the knights have moved.

* This is the last problem Moriarty composed during his childhood, and is clearly the most mature.

f For some unknown reason, over twenty years elapsed between the composition of M4 and of M5; the latter was not composed till after Moriarty obtained his doctorate. This problem is a profound one, and it is interesting to note the professional manner in which the questions are phrased.

White can castle. Is the White queen on d2 original or promoted?

Both sides can castle. The unknown on c6 is obviously

Black; we are given that it is not a rook.

A If it is a knight, then on what square was the missing Black queen captured?

B If it is the original queen, then on what square was the missing knight captured?

C If it is a promoted queen, then where was the knight captured?

Given :

Black's first move was pawn to d5. Knight on f5 has moved exactly three times. Black queen, king, and king's rook have never moved at all. Part I

A Prove that three of the pieces now on their home squares have moved.

B Has the pawn on h5 moved once or twice? C If the pawn h5 were on h6, would the position still be possible? Part II—Suppose we remove the Black bishop from c8 and give the following additional conditions:

This bishop is somewhere on the board (and on a white square).

It has never been on f7, nor has it crossed b7 or c6, and it did not move before the White bishop on g4 did. On what square is this bishop?

Neither king has moved. On f2 stands a black or white pawn. A White knight stands on either f3 or f4.

A What color is the pawn on f2?

B Does the White knight stand on f3 or f4?

Neither king has moved. On f2 stands a black or white pawn. A White knight stands on either f3 or f4.

A What color is the pawn on f2?

B Does the White knight stand on f3 or f4?

M10*

It is White's move. Can he mate in two?

* This is Moriarty's last problem—and one of his best. It was composed shortly before his death.

appendix ii

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