XtK

K—K

33 RxP

RxP

34 Kt—B 4!

P—Q Kt 4

35 Kt—Q 6, ch.

K—B

36 P—Q 5

P—B 3

37 Kt—Kt 71

Kt—B 5

38 P—Kt 4

P—Kt4

39 P—Q 6

Kt—K 3

40 K—Q 5 '

Kt—B 5, ch.

41 K—B 6

RxK RP

42 Kt—B 5

R—Q 7

43 R—B 8, ch.

K—B 2

44 P—Q7

Kt—K3

45 Kt x Kt

Kx Kt

46 P—Q 8—Q

RxQ

47 RxR

P—Kt 5

48 R—K 8, ch.

K—B 2

49 R—K 2

P—B 4

50 K—Q 5

K—B 3

51 K—Q4

P—B 5

52 K—K 4

K—Kt 4

53 R—Q B 2

P—B 6

From the Mannheim Tournament of 1914:

black (alekhine)

black (alekhine)

white (mieses)

white (mieses)

Black has a Pawn, but by no means an easy win: His Pawn at K 4 must be defended.

"The most difficult move in the whole game, for other defenses of his Q B P would be inadequate, e.g. (a) 28 , P—B 3. 29 P—Kt 5! P x P.

30 Kt x P and Black's material advantage would be illusory.

30 Kt—B 6, with a strongly posted Knight and good drawing chances. (A.)

29

P—Kt 5—Threatening P—Kt

6 and KtxKP.

P—Kt 3

30

KtxKP

R—Kt 5

31

R—B 6

RxKtP

32

R—Kt 6, ch.

Kt—Kt 2

33

R x K Kt P

P—R5!

34

K—B 2

R—B 4

35

K—K2

K—R2

Resigns.

From the Budapest Tournament in 1921:

black (alekhene)

black (alekhene)

white (steiner)

white (steiner)

White threatens to regain his Pawn and obtain a preferable position. The Black Pawn on both sides of the board are weak.

The exchanges have improved the Black position. Now 29 P—K R 4 would give White drawing chances.

34 B—Q 4 R—Q 7 and Black eventually won the game. The centralization of Black's forces by the preceding moves is noteworthy. The weak Rook Pawns have been discarded and Black is still a Pawn ahead.

A familiar picture from the Hague Tournament, 1921—the King, Rook and Pawns exerting the maximum pressure. Only the Bishop is backward, but not for long.

black (alekhine)

black (alekhine)

white (yates)

36 RxP

After 36 P x P Black continues P—B 6 followed by P—K 6, etc.

Threatening B—Kt 6 and B—Kt 5 and if 38 K—Q 2, P—K 6, ch. 39 PxP, PxP, ch. 40 K—B 2, B—B 4! ch., etc.

38

R—B 5, ch.

K—Q5

39

R—B 2

P—K6

40

PxP, ch.

PxP

41

R—B 6

B—Kt 5

42

R—Q 6, ch.

K—B4

43

P—R3

B—R4

44

Resigns.

From the London Tournament of 1922—a well-played Knight wins over a Bishop, "confined and hemmed in" by his own Pawns.

black (euwe)

black (euwe)

white (alekhine)

white (alekhine)

23 P—Q R 4

R—QB

24 R—Kt 3

K—Q 2

25 P—R 5

K—B 3

26 PxP

PxP

27 R—R 3

B—Kt 2

28 R—R 7

R—B 2

29 R—R 8

R—K2

30 R—B 8, ch.

K—Q2

31 R—K Kt 8

K—B3

32 P—R 4 to block in the Bishop.

K—B 2

33 P—K Kt 4

K—B 3

34 K—Q3

R—Q 2, ch.

35 K—B 3

R—KB 2

36 P—Kt 3

K—B 2

37 K—Q 3

R—Q 2, ch.

38 K—K 2

R—B 2

39 Kt—B 3!

R—K2

40 P—Kt 5

PxP

41 PxP

K—B 3

42 K—Q 3

R—Q 2, ch.

43 K—K 4

R—Kt 2

44 Kt—Kt 5

R—K2

45 P—B 3

K-Q2

46 R—Q Kt 8

K—B3

47 R—B 8, ck

K—Q2

A brilliant ending from the same Tournament:

black (yates)

black (yates)

white (alekhine)

white (alekhine)

This position arose from an inferior defence to the Queen's gambit declined. It is strategically won—but the winning procedure is instructive. The ending is brilliantly played by Alekhine.

24 K—B 2

K—R 2

25 P—R 4 •

R—KB

26 K—Kt 3

R (B)—Q Kt

27 R—B 7

B—Kt 4

28 R (B)—B 5

B—R3

29 R (B 5)—B 6

R—K

30 K—B 4

K—Kt

31 P—R 5

B—B 8

32 P—Kt 3

B—R3

33 R—B 7

K—R2

34 R (B 6)—B 7

R—K Kt

35 Kt—Q 7

K—R

36 Kt—B 6

R (Kt)—K B

37 RxPI

Rx Kt

38 K—K 5

BLACK (EUWE)

WHITE (ALEKHINE)

WHITE (ALEKHINE)

23 P—Q R 4

R—QB

24 R—Kt 3

K—Q2

25 P—R 5

K—B 3

26 PxP

PxP

27 R—R 3

B—Kt 2

28 R—R 7

R—B 2

29 R—R 8

R—K2

30 R—B 8, ch.

K—Q2

31 R—K Kt 8

K—B3

32 P—R 4 to block in the Bishop.

K—B 2

33 P—K Kt 4

K—B 3

34 K—Q 3

R—Q 2, ch.

35 K—B 3

R—KB 2

36 P—Kt 3

K—B 2

37 K—Q3

R—Q 2, ch.

38 K—K 2

R—B 2

39 Kt—B 3!

R—K2

40 P—Kt 5

PxP

41 P x P

K—B 3

42 K—Q 3

R—Q 2, ch.

43 K—K 4

R—Kt 2

44 Kt—Kt 5

R—K2

45 P—B 3

K—Q2

46 R—Q Kt 8

K—B 3

47 R—B 8, ch.

K—Q 2

A brilliant ending from the same Tournament:

black (yates)

black (yates)

white (alekhine)

white (alekhine)

This position arose from an inferior defence to the Queen's gambit declined. It is strategically won—but the winning procedure is instructive. The ending is brilliantly played by Alekhine.

24 K—B 2

K—R2

25 P—R 4

R—K B

26 K—Kt 3

R (B)—Q Kt

27 R—B 7

B—Kt 4

28 R (B)—B 5

B—R 3

29 R (B 5)—B 6

R—K

30 K—B 4

K—Kt

31 P—R 5

B—B 8

32 P—Kt 3

B—R3

33 R—B 7

K—R2

34 R (B 6)—B 7

R—K Kt

35 Kt—Q 7

K—R

36 Kt—B 6

R (Kt)—K B

37 RxP!

R x Kt

38 K—K 5

Resigns.

His game with Rubinstein resolved itself into a memorable ending.

black (alekhine)

black (alekhine)

white (rubinstein) After 29 .., P—Kt 5

The forces are quite even: Black exerts pressure against the Q Kt P, but the Bishop is a powerful piece in such a position.

BxP!

40 R (K 3)—Q 3 threatening 41 R—Q 7, ch., K—K. 42

42 R—Q, Kt—B 6. 43 R (Q)—Q 2, Kt—Kt 8, etc. The move made, however, is part of a deep plan that began with 37 P—R 5, and only fails because of an unexpected resource at Black's command.

Designed to meet 42 R—K Kt 8, which is a crushing blow in such a position.

8, Kt x P (if Kt x B. 44 R x Kt P, ch.) 44 R (Q 5) —Q 8, Kt—Q 3. 45 R—Q Kt 8!

A desperate situation for Black, but he finds a way out.

if White continues 44 R—Kt 5, threatening mate, Black in turn mates in 3 moves.

Facilitating Black's task: 50 P—Kt 4 was preferable, in which case might follow: P—R 5. 51 K—R 3, Kt—B 6. 52 P—Kt 51 with some drawing chances for White.

P—K 61

K—Kt

K—B

K—Kt 2

K—K2

B—Kt 8

K—Q3

B—B 7

K—B4

BxP

Kt x P

K—B 3

K—Q 5

B—B 7

K—Q 61

B x Kt

K-Q7

B—B4

P—Kt 6

BxP

P—K7

Resigns.

Baden in 1925 occurred a remarkable contest with a *ame combination leading to a problem-like ending, he final phase of the partie.

BLACK (ÄLEKHINE)

BLACK (ÄLEKHINE)

WHITE (RETl)

WHITE (RETl)

The finale, not at all easy to have foreseen:

41 KtxR

42 B x R Kt—Q 5 Resigns. For if 43 R—K 3, Kt x B

44 R x Kt, B—Q 4! and a piece is lost. Another fine ending from the Vienna Tournament of 1922.

black (reti)

A valuable lesson in the battle of Rooks and Pawns. White has just played 57 P—Kt 4, a final effort to win. But Black's reply forces a draw.

58 RxR PxR

Drawn.

The moves leading to the draw are instructive: 60 K—B 4, K—R 3. 61 K—K 4, K x P. 62 K— —Q 4, K—Kt 4. 63 K—B 4, K—B 4. 64 K x P, K—K 3. 65 K—Kt 5, K—Q 2. 66 K—Kt 6, K—B, etc.

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