The Orthodox System Nkb Bk Leonard Barden

After 1 P-Q4 N-KB3 2 P-QB4 P-KN3 3 N-QB3 B-N2 4 P-K4 P-Q3 5 N-B3 0-0 6 B-K2 P-K4 The orthodox system against the King's Indian shows the basic theme of White positional advance on the Q-side countered by Black's efforts to mount an attack against the White king. White's bishop on K2 controls important squares on the diagonal leading to QR6 and so can provide support for a general push aiming to open files for White's heavy pieces. The disadvantage of White's system is that, in contrast to the...

PxPRP xP

Q3 20 B-QN4 Q x B 21 QxN+ Evans. 21 B xN P-N5 22 R-QB3 with the dual threats 23 BxR and 23 R-KR3+ Tal. The position in diagram 158 is critical for this line. There are two continuations a) 20 N-B3 B-N2 21 R-N6 N-B5 22 B xN P xB 23 R-Ql Q-K2 24 R-K6 Q-B4+ 25 K-Bl R B1-Q1 26RxR+RxR 27Q-R4Q-B8 + 28 K-B2 B-KB1 29 P-QN4 B-K5 30 R-K8 (Better 30 Q-JST5) 30 . B-B3 31 Q xB Q xQ 32RxRQ-B3 33 R-B8 Q-K2 34 K-Bl K-R2 35 N-Q4 B-N2 36 N-N5 B-K4 37 P-QR3Q-Q2 38 R-QR8 P-B6 39 PxP BxP 40 K-N2 Q-N2+ 41 KxB Q-K4+...

Br

As in several similar positions in the classical system Black aims to exchange his inactive black-squared bishop. 10 P-QN4 P-QR4 The alternative is 10 . . . N-Kl and now a) 11 N-N3 B xB 12QxBand al) not 12 P-QB3 13 PxP PxP 14 P-QR4 B-K3 15 P-N5 P-KB4 16 P-B4 P-QR3 (Velimirovic suggests 16. . . P-Q4 with an unclear position) 17 BP x P RP x P 18RPxP RxR 19 Q xR QP xP 20 Q-R5 N-Q3 21 R-Ql PxKP 22 QxQ RxQ 23 N-B5 B-Bl 24 P-N6 with a winning position, Mecking-Naran-ja, Palma 1970. a2) but 12 P-KB4...

BP xPPQR

A) 10 N-N3 N-Kl 11 B-Q3 N-B4 12 B-QB2 P-B4 13 B-B2 P-B5 (13 B-R3J ) 14 N-Bl P-QR4 (14 Q-N4 15 R-KN1 Q-K2q ) 15 P-QR3 B-Q2 16 N-Q2 P-QN4 17 Q-K2 R-Nl 18 0-0 P-N4 (18 . . . P-R5-) 19 P-QR4 Petrosian-Penrose, Palma 1969. b) 10 P-KN4 P-KR4 11 P-KR3 and now bl) 11 N-R2 12 P xP Q-R5 + 13 B-B2 Q x P R4 14 N-N3 Q-N4 b2) 11 N-N3 12 B-N5 Q-Kl 13 B-R4 B-Q2 14 P-QN3 Bobotsov-Ong Yok Hwa, Zwolle 1966. 10 P-KN4 An idea of Lilienthal's is 10 N-N3, but it appears unconvincing after 10 P-QN4 11 P-KR4 P-N5. 10...

RNl

D421 12 P-QR4 13 B-Bl Q-B2 14P-QR4 after which White is worse. Correct, of course, was 14 P-N3 intending P-R3 and P-QN4. P-QR4 in such situations is only good for White (cf. D422) if the exchange BP xQP answered by BP x QP has occurred. In that case P-QR4 contributes towards the control of the Q-side light squares (b5 c4) which White can occupy with pieces. If White plays P-QR4 before this exchange has occurred he merely blockades his own army, since the squares b5 and c4 are not yet available...

Knk Qr

Osnos-Vogt, Zinnowitz 1971, went 13Q-Q2P-B5 14BxNPxB 15 Q-Q3 N-B3 Not 15 BxP 16 QxP 16 0-0-0 Q xBP 17 P-N5P-K5 18Q-Q2N-R4 19NxKP Q-R5 20 R R1-B1 If 20 N xQBP P-B6 21 N-B3 N-N6 22 R-R2 BxN 23 PxB QxBP F Uhl-mann 20 P-B6 21 N-Nl N-N6 with much the better prospects for Black. After 1 P-Q4 N-KB3 2 P-QB4 P-KN3 3 N-QB3 B-N2 4 N-B3 0-0 5 P-K4 P-Q3 6 B-K3 263 Larsen used this move during his run of tournament victories in 1967, though it was known at least as far back as 1931. This seems best...