The Chess Review

R-QKt3, RxP; 27 Q-Q5, R-B7ch; 28 K-Kt3, RxKP (threatens . . . R-K6ch etc.); 29 K-Kt4, QxQ; 30 PxQ, R-B8 and wins. The text is played to avoid a subsequent exchange of Rs.

The alternative would have been 23 Kt-Kt5 with a view to 21 Kt-QI. But Black would continue with 23 . . . P-KI (24 PxP, KtxP) with a won game.

Dr. Alekhine

Dr. Euwe

An attempt to fish in troubled waters. After 24 PxP, PxP; 25 R-Rl, P-Q5 Black wins the BP, resulting in the collapse of White's position. Note that this variation would not be so favorable if the Black K were still on Ktl. There would follow 26 Kt-K4 and if 26 . . . RxP? 27 Kt-B6ch wins the exchange.

Another way is 24 . . . QxR; 25 PxP, Q-Q2; 26 PxKt, QxQ followed by . . . RxP. But the text is more accurate.

25 . . . P-Q5; 26 Q-K4, PxKt wins a whole piece, but allows some counterplay (27 R-K7), Alekhine prefers therefore to take only the exchange, as he still retains the attack.

26 Q-Q2 QxR 30 RxR RxR

27 PxP Q-B2 31 Q-R3 R-Kt5ch

28 QxKt RxBP 32 K-B2 P-KR3

29 Q-Q3 Q-R4 Resigns

(De Scbdetkwereld)

(A quiet opening is jollowed by fascinating complications)

World Championship Match

(Twenty-second game) Delft—November 27-28, 1937 RETI OPENING (Notes by Dr. Max Euwe and Fred Reinfeld) Dr. A. Alekhine Dr. M. Euwe

White Black

1 Kt-KB3 P-Q4 4 PxP KtxP

2 P-B4 P-Q5 5 KtxKt QxKt

7 . . . P-K4 looks more natural, but after 8 B-K3, Q-Ql; 9 P-Q4 opens up the game advantageously for White; on the other hand, Black's plan of development gives him rather a cramped game—all or which hardly speaks well for his 3rd move. (R)

It is now apparent that Black's 14th move was a case of "the wrong Rook," . . , KR-Q1 being correct at that point to hold the QR file. Black has somewhat the worse of it now. (R)

Not 19 . . . RxR; 20 RxR, R-Rl? 21 RxRch, BxR; 22 Q-R3 winning a P. (11)

20 RxR BxR

From the viewpoint of equalizing, . , , RxR was better. Alekhine now seizes a favorable opportunity to open up the position. (R)

21 . . . P-QB4?? would cost a piece (22 P-Q6!). while if 21 . . . BxKt; 22 QxB threatening to win with B-R6. (R)

22 PxP Kt-B4

After 22 . . . BxKt, White can either win a P with 23 PxP! or else he can play 23 R-QB1 advantageously. (R)

23 Q-B4 PxP

24 BxP BxB

Even after 24 . . . BxKt; 25 PxB, BxB; 26 QxB White's advantage would still persist to a certain extent. (R)

25 KtxB Q-K4

26 R-Kt1 Kt-R5

Beginning a series of ingenious Kt moves on both sides. Despite Black's clever play, his QKtP is not long for this world. Note that if 26 . . . R-Ktl? 27 B-B4 and 27 . . . Q-B4? will not do because of 28 Kt-K7ch. (It)

27 P-Q Kt3 Kt-Kt7

28 Q-B6 P-QKt4

So that if 29 QxQKtP? R-Ql; 30 B-Bl, Kt-Q82 wins. (R)

But now the pin would be useless (29 . . . Q-R4; 30 QxQKtP, R-Ql; 31. Kt-K7ch). (R)

30 QxQKtP Q-K5

If now 31 R-KI31, R-Ql wins a piece. But Alekhine maneuvers very ingeniously. (R)

Not 31 . . . R-Ql; 32 B-Kt5! and if 32 . . . RxKt; 33 R-BSch, B-Bl; 34 B-R6. The text looks deadly, but there is an antidote. (R)

33 R-B1 KtxB

Hoping for 31 KtxKt, QxQ; 35 PxQ, R-Bl; 36 R-Bl, B-R3; 37 P-Kt3, BxKt and White's winning chances are slim. (R)

34 QxKt Q-Kt4

38 R-Q3 which, incidentally, is the safest reply to the text. (R)

40 R-KB1 Q-Kt7

It is difficult to say whether the reply 43 RxB, Q-B8ch; 44 Q-Bl, QxKt; 45 RxPch is superior to the text. (R)

K-Rl was better, in order to avoid the possibility of diagonal checks. (R)

The position continues to bristle with malicious fine points (if 43 . . . RxP? 44 RxB) wins; or 43 . . . R-Rl; 44 Q-KB3, R-R7; 45 Kt-Kt4). (R)

44 Q-KB3

46 Kt-K6ch

47 Kt-B4

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