NxNPPB

The only move, hoping to creep out via KB2. If 20 . . . NxR 21 PxN P-B3 22 N-B5, or 20 . . . B-Bl 21 Q.R5 and 22 P-B5, in both cases with a crushing advantage.

21 PxP

NxR

22 QrN4!

N-K7+

23 K-Nl

B-Bl

24 N-B5+

K-B2

25 QrR5+

K-K3

26 PxB

B-Q.2

27 PxR=N+

1-0

27 . . . RxN 28 N-N7+ K-K2 29 QxN+, and White is a piece ahead.

27 . . . RxN 28 N-N7+ K-K2 29 QxN+, and White is a piece ahead.

Bellon-Larsen Las Palmas 1977

Most Grandmasters tremble when a speculative continuation is played against them, but not Bent—he has nerves of steel.

18 PxP BxP

19BxP+ KxB20Q-R4+ K-Nl 21 RxB Q-N5 is also unclear. The idea of the text move is to deprive Black of the opportunity of exchanging queens with . . . Q-N5.

20 R-K3

Now 20 BxP+ must be met by 20. . . K-Rl (20 . . . KxB?? 21 Q-R4+ and

22 R-R3 wins for White, since Black can no longer play . . . QxR now that his queen has been decoyed of. . . Q2) 21 QR4 (if 21 R K3 QxR! kills the attack) 21 . . . BxR 22 B-N6+ K-Nl

23 BxN Q-K6+ winning for Black.

21 BxP+ KxB

21... K-R1 would now be wrong on account of 22 B-K4, with a very strong attack.

Much too slow. White should have been content with 22 Q-R4+ K-Nl 23 R-KN3 B-N5! 24 RxN KR-K1 25 RxP!, forcing a draw.

This simple move refutes White's attack and leaves Black a rook ahead for nothing: 23 P-B5 K-Nl 24 R-KN3 R-KR2 25 PxB QxP 26 QxN Q-K«+ 27 QrBl QxQ+ 28 KxQ PxP 29 PxP R-QB1, and Black's extra material was decisive.

Voitsekh-Zelinsky

USSR Corres Ch ¿-final 1969-70

10 P-KN4

11 BxN

12 P-N5

13 P-B5

P-QB4

P-Q3

N-KB3

P-QR3

P-K3

B-K2

Q-B2

QN-Q2

P-N4

N-Q2

has been shown to be too risky on account of 15 BxP+ PxB 16 N/4xNP,e.g.

a) 16 ... Q-R4? 17 N xP+ K-K2 18 Q-R51 P-N3 19 QxB + P-B3

20 Q-R6 1-0 Seuss-Beni, Austria 1965; or

19 P-K5 + ; or 18 ... B-R3 19 NxP!±) 19 NxP! QxN (19 ... KxN 20PxP + K-Nl 21 R-Q8 + followed by mate) 20 RxB B-N2

21 Q-B2 .. and it is not easy for Black to free himself because of his unfortunately placed king'—O'Kelly.

After 13 ... BxP+ 14 K-Nl, 14 ... P-K4 provides no joy for Black because of the thematic 15 N-K6! PxN 16 Q-R5 + etc., while 14 ... N-K4 fails to 15 Q-R5 B-B3 16 PxP±. 14 P-B61 This is the only way for White to continue his attack. All of the alternatives allow Black's Q-side counterplay to get moving too fast:

a) 14 R-Nl P-N5 15 N/3-K2 P-K4 16 P-B6 PxN 17 PxB P-Q6! + Boleslavsky-Aronin, USSR Ch 1956;

b) 14 P-N6 RPxP 15 PxNP B-N4+! 16 K-Nl P-N5 17N/3-K2 PxP 18 Q-N4 B-B3 19QxNP + Q-B2+—Gutman;

c) 14 P-QR3?! BxP+ 15 K-Nl 0-0! + Pietzsch-Bogdanovie, Sarajevo 1966;

d) 14 PxP PxP 15 B-R3 P-N5 16 N/3-K2 B xP+ 17 K-Nl (so far we have followed Mukhin-Danov, Irkutsk 1966) 17 ... B-B3I+ ; or e) 14 P-N4?! N-R5! ISNxNPxN 16 P xP B xNP+ 17 K-Nl 0-0!+ Matulovic-Masic, Yugoslav Ch 1969.

15 PxP B-Bl

We must regard the text as dubious because it commits White to the knight sacrifice that follows and on the basis of the games and analyses at our disposal the sacrifice would appear to fall short of soundness.

16 Q-R5 is now regarded as the correct continuation, and if 16 ... P-N5 ?, 17 N-Q5! works because White's queen soon comes into the mêlée, Scholl-Donner, Amsterdam

1970 concluded 16 Q-R5! P-N5? 17 N-Q55 PxN 18 PxP B-Q2 19 R-K1 + K-Ql 20 QxBP (Krnic recommends 20 K-Nl as being stronger. After 20 Q x BP he gives 20 ... B-R3+ 21 K-Nl B-Kl!) 20 ... K-Bl 21 R-Nl K-N2

23 QxQ+ KxQ 24 PxB±±) 23 NxN PxN 24 B-R3 K-B2 25 R-K6! Q-N2 26 QxB/7 + ! KxQ 27 R-K7 + + K-Q3 28 RxQ KxP 29 R-Kl B-R3 + 30 K-Nl KR-K1 31 R/7-K7 1-0.

After 16 Q-R5, Black's best seems to be 16 ... B-Q2 when 17 B-R3 P-N5 18 N/3-K2 0-0-0 19 Q xBP B-R3 + 20 K-Nl QR-B1 21 Q-R5 RxP 22 KR-B1 R/l-Bl 23 RxR RxR 24 Q-R4 R-N3 25 N-KB3 produces a very complex position as in Parma-Zuckerman, Netanya 1971 and Browne-Mecking, San Antonio 1972.

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