Pk Pk Nqb Nqb Nb Bn Nq Br Bb

Capablanca falls into Legal's trap (c. 1750!), and loses a pawn.

9NxN!BxQ 10N-KB6+ K-Bl 11 N6-Q7 + QxN 12 NxQ.+ K-Kl 13 RxB KxN 14 BxP Q.R-KB1 15 B-R5! B-N3 16 B-N4+ K-Kl 17 R-Bl N-B3 18 B-K3? BxB 19 PxB K-K2 20 R-B4 R-B3 21 R1-KB1 R1-KB1 22 P-Q.R3 N-K4 23 B-K2 N-Q2 24 B-B4 P-B3 25 P-KN4? RxR 26 P x R.

The endgame should, of course, be drawn; but it would be easier for White if he were to continue 26 R x R RxR 27 PxR N-B3 28 K-N2. Instead he manages to get four isolated pawns and to place them all on light-coloured squares, positional hara-kiri one might say.

26 . . . N-B3 27 B-Q.3 N x NP 28 P-R3 N-B3 29 K-B2 P-KN4! 30 K-K3 P x P+ 31 R x P R-KN1 32 R-R4 P-N4 33 R-B4 R-N7 34 R-B2 RxR 35 KxR K-K3 36 K-K3 K-K4 37 P-N3 N-Q.2 38 P-B4 ? P x P 39 P x P P-B4 40 B-K2 N-Nl 41 B-Q.1 N-B3 42 B-K2 N-Q5 43 B-Q.1 N-K3 44 P-KR4 N-B5 45 P-R5 N-K3 46 B-K2 P-KR3 47 B-N4 N-Q5 48 B-Ql K-B3 49 K-B4 N-K3 + 50 K-K3 N-Q5 51 K-B4 P-R3 52 P-R4 N-B3 53 B-K2 N-K4 54 B-Bl P-R4.

The pawns are all fixed, and Black commences his final manoeuvres.

55 B-K2 N-Q.2 56 B-Q.1 N-N3 57 B-N3 K-K3 58 K-B3 K-K4 59 K-K3 N-Q.2 60 B-Q.1 K-B3 61 K-B4 N-K4 62 B-K2 K-K3! 63 B-Bl K-K2! 64 K-B5.

There is nothing better. If 64 K-K K-B3 65 K-B4 N-Q.2, or if 64 B-K K-B3 (completing Black's triangula tion) 65 B-Bl N-Q2, in either cas threatening 66 . . . N-N3.

64 . . . N-Q2 65 K-N6 N-N3 66 K x P K-B2 67 B-R3 (32).

It would seem probable that Black could win by 67 ... N x BP, for if 68 B-K6+ KxB 69 K-N7 N-K4 70 P-R6 N-B2.

Instead the game ended 67 ... K-Nl ? 68 K-N6 N x RP 69 K-B6 N-N3 70 P-K5 PxP 71 K x P P-R5 72 B-B5 P-R6 73 B-Nl N-R5 74 B-R2 K-R2 75 K-Q6 K-R3 76 K-B6 K x P 77 B-N3

33 JRC - Walter Penn Shipley

Manhattan CC-Franklin CC New York, 30 May 1910

'The dean of chess in America for several generations', writes the American Chess Bulletin of Shipley, on the sad occasion of his death in 1942. He promoted correspondence chess in USA, often acted as arbiter for chess disputes, being noted for his impartial judgments, actively assisted Pillsbury, Capablanca, and others in their chess careers, gave generously as a patron, and edited an excellent chess column in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

This is one of only four occasions on which Capablanca played for his club. His play is nicely balanced between middle-game attack and endgame advantage, with, of course, the usual little combinative touches.

5 Px P QxP

7 Px B PxB

After 9 . . . B-N4 10 Q-B4! the complications would favour White.

11B-K2 R-Nl

Black foregoes the possibility of castling on this side, and White makes a plan to prevent Black's castling on the other side.

13B-Q3 Q-N5

17B-K4 N-B4

If 17 ... Q-QB4 18 KR-K1 Q-R6 + 19 K-N1 Q-N5 + 20 Qx Q

with the better endgame.

18 KR-K1 NxB

Here 18 ... RxP, with difficult play, would be the logical continuation if Black's 11th move were to be justified.

Now if 19 ... RxP 20 Q-K3 Qx P 21 R-Q5! threatening R-R4.

After 22 . . . K-Kl the sacrifice would not be clear. White has his pawn, however, and might simply continue 23 R-Q4.

25K-R1 Qx P

The extra piece is decisive: 26 R-Kl P-N3 27 P-N4 R-Ql 28 Q-B5 + K-Nl 29 Q-K4 R-Q8 + 30 K-N2 Q.-N4+ 31 K-B3 Q-Q.B4+ 32 Q.-QB4 Q.-R6+ 33 Q.-N3 Q-B4 + 34 K-N2 R x R 35 N x R Qx KBP 36 N-Q3 Q-B3+ 37 Q-B3 Q-B8 38 Q-R8+ K-N2 39 Qx P Q-B3 + 40 P B3 Q-B6 41 N-Kl Q-K7 + 42 N-B2 Q-N4+ 43 N-N4! P-R4 44 Q-K4+ K-Nl 45 P-QR4 Q-B8 46 N-B6+ 1-0. Black must exchange queens or be checkmated.

34 JRC - Hermann G. Voigt

Philadelphia, 21 October 1910

An exhibition game of high quality. Voigt played in ten of the famous cable matches against Britain, scoring 3 + 2 — 5 = ; he was also champion of Philadelphia five times.

5 P-K3 N-K5 Black should castle before playing this move. Then he could, if necessary, defend his QP with his KR.

7 PxP

8 PxN

QxB NxN PxP P-QB3

9 ... QrQ.3 would be better. After the passive text-move White gets pressure on the queen's side, and on the dark-coloured squares.

11 P-B4 PxP

20 QR-N1 QR-N1

White has a bind on the queen's wing, and a central pawn majority ready to expand. He has won the positional struggle, and his pieces are placed in readiness for the tactical phase which follows.

What else ? If 21 ... B-B2 22 KR-K1 threatening both Qx RP and P-KB3. If 21 ... P-KN4 22 NxB Qx N 23 Qx RP. If 21 ... P-QR3 22 KR-B1 P-KN4 23 NxB Qx N

24 Qx Qwith a won rook-ending.

22 KR-B1 P-QN4 Black sacrifices a pawn for counter play. 22 . . . B-R3 would leave Whit a free hand in the centre.

23 PxP PxP

25 Q-B5 R-R7 Black threatens RxP, but Whit has prepared a reply.

Seizing the remote open file. If now 27 ... BxP 28 P-B3! QxKP + 29 QxQRxQ 30 R-B8+ K-B2 31 R-Q8 R-K4 32 R-R7 +. 27... P-N4

29 . . . R x QP 30 Q-B6 would be satisfactory. After the text-move Black threatens 30 ... R x QP, but he is thwarted by an unexpected sacrifice.

Once again it seems that Black is getting back on his feet, but another blow falls.

For if 38 ... Q-Ql 39 N x P! Qx N 40 P-Q7. A very fine game indeed.

35 JRC - Miguel A. Gelly

Buenos Aires, 12 May 1911

Black's 10th move seems natural, and others, including the great Pillsbury, have so played; but it is a decisive error, which Capablanca exploits in impeccable style.

This is the first of a series of thirteen exhibition games against the best players of Argentina. He won them all.

1 P K4 P K1 2 N-KB3 N-QB3 3 N-B3 N-B3 4 B-N5 B-N5 5 0-0 0-0 6 P-Q3 P-Q3 7 B-N5 B x N 8 PxB N-K2 9 N-R4 P-B3 10 B-QB4 B-K3? 11 BxN PxB 12 BxB PxB 13 Q-N4 + K-B2 14 P-KB4 N-N3 15 P-B5 PxP 16 RxP! N-B5 17 R-KB1 R-KN1 18 0-B3 K-K3 19 P-N3 K-Q2 20 K-Rl N-K3 21 Q R5 ! N-N4 22 R x BP K-B2 23 N-N2 Q-Kl 24 Q-R6 R-N3 25 R x R Qx R 26 QxQPxQ 27 R-B6 N-R6 28 N-K3 1-0.

36 JRC - Carlos M. Portela

Buenos Aires, 15 May 1911

Black's early greed is punished by a decisive king's side attack. Note White's brilliant 21st move, giving back the piece he has gained in order to keep the diagonal open for his bishop.

1 P-K4 P-K4 2 N-KB3 N-QB3 3 N-B3 N-B3 4 B-N5 B-N5 5 0-0 0-0 6 P-Q3 P-Q.3 7 B-N5 N-K2 8 N-KR4 K-Rl ? 9 B QB4 P-B3 10 P-B4 B-Q.B4 + 11 K-R1 N-N5 ? 12 P-B5! N-B7+ 13 RxN BxR 14 P-B6! PxP 15 Bx P4- K-Nl 16 N-B5 BxN 17 PxB Q-Q2 18 Q-N4 + N-N3 19 Q-R5 B-K6 20 P x N P-KR3 21 N-Q5! P x N 22 B x QP QR-B1 23 R-KB1 RxP

37 Leopoldo Carranza — JRC

Buenos Aires, 19 May 1911

Capablanca opens in the manner of Steinitz and advances his pawns in a way that would have delighted the heart of Philidor; but the magnificent ending with rooks is one of his own specialities.

12 BxN

This exchange does not help White's game. He could play 12 B-N3. Alternatively Capablanca gives the following: 12 Q-N3! K-R2 13 Qx P BxN 14 B x N R-QN1 15 Qx BP QxQ 16 Nx QB x NP 17R-KN1 B-R6 18 R-N3 B B1, noting that Black would have sufficient compensation for the pawn.

Now Black's pawns roll forward. White should try 15 P-QB4. 15 . . . P-Q4!

Black crosses the KB-file at the right moment; if now 24 P-KB4 P x P 25RxBP+ K-K3 26Rl-KBlRxR 27 R x R P-R5! and wins.

28 P-KN4 P-KR5

This game answers the charge that Capablanca was merely a 'piece-player'. He has already made sixteen pawn-moves; moreover he has achieved a won two-rooks ending, although neither rook has yet moved!

The endgame is beautifully played, the pawns advancing relentlessly. At the finish White runs out of moves altogether.

29 . . . R-B2 30 R-B2 R2-QR2 31 K-Q3 P-R5 32 PxP P-B5 + 33 K-Q.2 RxP 34 R-QN1 R-R8 35 R2-B1 RxR 36 R x R R-R7 37 K-Ql P-N5 38 K-Q2 K-Q3 39 K-Q.1 K-B4 40 P-N3 P-B6 41 R-Bl P-Q6! 42 PxP R KR7 43 R-B2 R-R8 + 44 K-K2 K-Q5! 0-1.

38 Emilio Carranza - JRC

Buenos Aires, 22 May 1911

Senor Carranza misses a chance to join the immortal few who defeated Capablanca.

White opens too passively; on the 14th move he should contest rather than occupy the centre, e.g. 14 0—0—0 perhaps following with P-KB4. O Black's 20th move the less said the better: even Homer nods from time to time. 20 . . . Q-B3 would maintain Black's advantage.

1 P-K4 P-K4 2 N-KB3 N-QB3 3 B-N5 P-QR3 4BxNQPxB 5 P-Q.3 B-Q.3 6 N-B3 B-KN5 7 B-K3 N-K2 8 P-KR3 B-R4 9 P-KN4B-N3 10 Q.-Q2 P-Q.B4! 11 N-KR4 P-KB3 12 N-B5 NxN 13 KPxN B-B2 14 N-K4 P-QN3 15 P-N3 B-K2 16 P-KB4 PxP 17 BxKBP Q-Q2 18 Q.-B3 P-QR4 19 P-QR4 P-B5! 20 0-0-0 B-N5 ? ? (35).

21 Q-N2 ? ? It is not even difficult to see that White could win quickly by 21 N x P+ ! P x N 22 KR-K1 + . 21 . . . Q-B3

The game, as Alekhine would say when he himself had emerged un scathed after a blunder, resumes its natural course.

A mistake, but in any case Black would win in due course by P-QN4, breaking through on the queen's side.

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