Pqb Pqn Nqb Bn Pq Nkb Pk Pk Nb Bk Bq Pq Pqn Nq Bnnk Qk Pkb Qrb

If you are Capablanca, of course, you ignore the threatened fork, select the right sequence of moves, and exchange the pieces in order to get a won endgame. 25 . . . P-K6 26 N-Q.6 Px P+ 27 QxP QxQ+ 28 KxQ. R-KB1+ 29 K-Nl B-B3 30 N-K6 R-B3 31 NxBP N-K.4 32 NxP N-B6+ 33 K-Rl R-R3 34 R-Q.2 RxNP 35N-KB5. White forks again, but his knight have wandered too far. Black ha prepared a surprise finish 35 R-N8+ 36 RxR N x R Q.7+ 37 R-N2 BxR+ 3 KxBRxN 0-1. Two days previously...

Contents

2 Match and Exhibition Games 3 4 Simultaneous Games with Clocks 8 5 Casual and Other Games 10 7 Simultaneous Games 141 Studies 16 The Chess Record of Capablanca 16 Tournaments 17 Team Events 172 Individual Matches 174 Exhibition Games 17 Consultation Games 17 Simultaneous Displays with Clocks 179 Simultaneous Displays 180 Index of Players 19 Index of Openings 19 Index of Endgames 19 Index of Sources 199 During the quarter of a century from 1911 to 1936 Capablanca was one of the world's best two...

LilJil

The endgame after 40 B-K5+ K-Nl 41 N-B3. In fact, it would be drawn. Or perhaps, in reply to 37 . . . P-N3, White could reply 38 R-K5 with the idea of mopping up some pawns for his piece. If, however, Black withdraws his queen in the hope of winning then he misjudges the position. Now Black's only advantage, the queen's side pawn majority, disappears and White winds up with a splendid finish, the minor piece crowding out the queen 40 B x P R-QB7 41 B-Q4 Q-QR3 42N-B7 + K-R2 43N-N5 + K-R3 44...

Pk Pk Nqb Nqb Nb Bn Nq Br Bb

N1-K2 6 0-0P-Q3 7P-Q4B-KN5 8 PxP NxP Capablanca falls into Legal's trap (c. 1750 ), and loses a pawn. 9NxN BxQ 10N-KB6+ K-Bl 11 N6-Q7 + QxN 12 NxQ.+ K-Kl 13 RxB KxN 14 BxP Q.R-KB1 15 B-R5 B-N3 16 B-N4+ K-Kl 17 R-Bl N-B3 18 B-K3 BxB 19 PxB K-K2 20 R-B4 R-B3 21 R1-KB1 R1-KB1 22 P-Q.R3 N-K4 23 B-K2 N-Q2 24 B-B4 P-B3 25 P-KN4 RxR 26 P x R. The endgame should, of course, be drawn but it would be easier for White if he were to continue 26 R x R RxR 27 PxR N-B3 28 K-N2. Instead he manages to get four...

Rkr Kn

If now 36 R-KR8 R x P 37 R x P K-N2 temporarily putting the White rook out of play, e.g. 38 P-N5 R-K.5 39 K-B3 R-QB5 40 K-N3 P-N4 41 P-R5 P-N5 42 P x P P x P 43 R-R2 P-N6. A simultaneous display with clocks is very different from one without, as masters often find to their cost. If, say, there are ten opponents then, at twenty moves an hour, the master must play at an average speed of 200 moves an hour but things do not turn out this way. Some games take more time. If half the games were played...

Pq Pkb Pk Nkb Nkb Pqn Pqn Bn Nq Pk Bn Pqr Pqr Bk Bq Pq Nk Nq Nb

Hereabouts White loses the opening struggle. 11 P-KB4 would be satis factory and on his next move, instead of 12 Q.-K2, he could play 12 B-N5. 11 B-Q3 12 Q.-K2 N-K5 13NxNQxN 14N-K5. White makes the king's side safe if, for instance, 14 N-Q2 R-B3 15 P-KB3 R-R3 but he gets a very poor game on the queen's side. 14 . . . BxN 15 PxB N-B4 16 P-KB4 NxB 17 PxN P-B4 18 KR-B1 KR-B1 19 P-Q4 B-R3 21 Bx P 22 B-B3 Q-R5 23 Q.-Q2 R-B3 24 P-R3 R1-QB1 25 K-R2 B-R3 26 Q.-N2 B-Q6 27 B-Q.2 B-B7 28 K-N3 Q-B5 29 K-B2...

Info

(a) American Chess Bulletin, 1937, p. 84. (b) Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 19 May 1907. (c) Washington Evening Star, 10 Jan 1909. (d) Louisville Times, 1 June 1912. (e) Revista del Club Argentino de Ajedrez, July-Sept 1914. (f) American Chess Bulletin, 1918, p. 107. (g) Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 12 Dec. 1918 (h) Possibly a simultaneous display with clocks. (j) Date given as 31 April in Revista Mexicana de Ajedrez, 1933, p. 173. (k) Diario de la Marina, 1 March 1936. (1) Diario de la Marina, 29 Sept 1938....