H A

In spite of being on the move, White must lose a Rook. Even if White plays the "desperado" 1 RxPch, an amusing position arises after 1 . . . PxR, where anv move by the Rook leads to mate: 2 O-O R-Nl mate or 2 R-Nl (or Bl) 2 . . . B-B6 followed by 3 . . . R-Q8 mate. Of course 1 P-B3 BxR 2 R-KN1

R-Q8ch 3 K-B2 RxR gives Black an easy win.

Like Fish in a Barrel

Advanced pawns can also work with the Rook and Bishop to create mating situations when they cut off nearby escape squares from the enemy King.

Once again, there are many tactical elements available.

Wagenfuehrer-NN (1945): I QxPch KxQ 2 R-R4 mate.

The Queen opened the KR file, the Rook followed on its heels, while the pawn and Bishop took nearby squares away from the King.

Skuya-Rosenberg (1962): 1 QxNch! (with this sacrifice, White eliminates both pieces covering KR2) I . . . RxQ 2 RxPch KxR 3 R-Rl mate.

Kozlovskaya-Cardosso (1971): 1 QxPch! NxQ 2 RxNch KxR 3 R-R3ch Q-R4 (3 . . . K-N3 4 B-R5ch K-R3 5 BxQ mate) 4 BxQ, Black resigns.

So Be It

Two more mating positions which occur in practice:

Tal (White) had a combination based on the first position against Suetin (1969).

1 QxN! (the Knight defending KB2 must be eliminated) 1 . . . PxQ 2 PxPch, Black resigns. 2 . . . K-Q2 (or Ql) 3 B-B5ch loses quickly, and on 2 . . . K-Bl ,3 B-R6ch, we have one of our basic mates.

Tseitlin (White) had a striking finish in his speed game with Kuzmin (1975).

R3 and then came the surprising 3 Q-B8ch! RxQ 4 B-N7 mate.

Siamese Twins

In the endgame, when passed pawns are supported by Rooks and Bishops, and then advance, mating nets are often formed on the edge of the board.

This situation is neatly depicted in twin problems by Pauli (1911). The task: mate in three moves.

Now only 2 . . . O-O will prevent mate on the back rank, but then 3 R-N3 mate.

Here both sides have lost the right to castle, therefore 1 RxRP with the following variations: 1 . . . NxR/3 2 R-K2 and 3 R-K8 mate; 1 . . . NxRch 2 K-B2; 1 . . . N-K6ch 2 K-Bl.

Not Only in the Endgame

Analogous positions can arise in the middlegame.

Rybakov-Sveshnikov (1974): 1 RxQP! QxR 2 BxP Q-Q2 3 Q-R8ch BxQ 4 RxB mate. (In the game Black declined the Rook sacrifice—1 . . . Q-K2—but this of course did not save him from defeat.)

Lodge-Smith (1971-2, correspondence ): I RxBch! KxR 2 N-K6ch BxN 3 B-Q4ch K-N1 (3. . . R-B3 4 PxB) 4 Q-R6 K-B2 5 PxBch K-Kl 6 QxRch! KxQ 7 R-Rl, Black resigns.

Solve It Yourself

Seidler-Wexler (1972)

White's Move When the sentry perishes . . .

Volchok-Kreslavsky (1970)

White's Move

Can you take advantage of the pinned Black Queen?

140 142

Evans-Bisguier (1958) Belov-Osatchuk (1965)

White's Move Pin and counterpin.

White's Move Like a machine gun.

White's Move Pin and counterpin.

Dely-Grags (1953)

White's Move Like a machine gun.

Driksna-Strautinsh (1968)

White's Move The gun is cocked.

Black's Move

White's Move The gun is cocked.

Black's Move

On I . . . BxR White replies 2 PxN and breathes freely. But if.. .

Snyder-Browne (1974)

Snyder-Browne (1974)

Black's Move

Koltanowsky-Krause (1957)

Koltanowsky-Krause (1957)

Black's Move

He played the "pretty" 1 . . . Q-B3? The American master smiled.

Koshevoy-Ruinsky (1972)

Koshevoy-Ruinsky (1972)

Black's Move

I . . . N-K5? and the QBP can be safely taken after the Bishop retreats. The Bishop retreated, but not where Black was thinking.

Butnorus-Gutman (1974)

Butnorus-Gutman (1974)

White's Move

148 150

Dementiev-Karpov (1970) Tseshkovsky-Gufeld (1975)

White's Move

White's Move

"I was still a boy then," said the World Champion.

Heissert-Stark (1973)

Black's Move Two Queens are no problem.

Meyer-Mek (1932)

White's Move

Black's Move I . . . RxN, so as, after 2 RxR, to attack with 2 . . . Q-R4? (but is this worth the exchange? ). White, however, answered 2 PxR.

White's Move

There are more than exchanges.

Winawer-NN (1896)

Winawer-NN (1896)

White's Move

You can do it like this or like that.

Castel-Rada (1932)

Castel-Rada (1932)

White s Move

A kaleidoscope of devices.

Aitken-Kefler (1955)

Aitken-Kefler (1955)

Black's Move

Queens don't retreat. 155

Bungan-Grovl (1933)

Bungan-Grovl (1933)

Black's Move

So who wins?

156 158

Schulten^Horwitz (1846) Alexandrov-S. Zaitsev (1974)

Black's Move As old as the hills.

White's Move The "Devil's Wheel."

Black's Move As old as the hills.

Tarrasch-NN (1931)

White's Move The "Devil's Wheel."

Vikman-Kamko (1973)

White's Move A breath of fresh air.

White's Move

White's Move A breath of fresh air.

White's Move

How can he break through to the back rank?

Richter-NN (1957)

Richter-NN (1957)

White's Move Three moves as a warning.

Markov-Luzganov (1963)

Black's Move

We have the epaulettes—now all we need is a general.

Selivanovsky-Yaroshevsky (1958)

White's Move The road to the scaffold.

Komov-Kharitonov (1973)

White's Move One move from mate . . .

164 166

Oberle-Pfister (1958) Vilerte-Kostina (1972)

Black's Move A topsy-turvy epaulette.

Rosenthal-NN (1873)

Black's Move Simple and convincing.

White's Move Black's Move

All according to plan. Decisive and surprising.

Amrein-Lummar (1955)

Amrein-Lummar (1955)

Black's Move Astonishing and irresistible.

Kunnerman^-NN (1934)

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