I

The fact that two pawns on the sixth rank are admirably adapted to form part of a mating net proves very helpful to Black in the next example. He could at best only hope for a draw. With his pawn so far advanced, White not unnaturally plays for a win. Black's subsequent play is most ingenious. White should have been content with a draw by 2 R Kt 5 ch, K R 5 3 R Kt 4, etc. Although two connected pawns on the sixth rank are a most powerful weapon, any advanced...

Zeck-travin Game Chess 1933

The black Rook is now pinned from two sides and is lost. White has neatly turned the tables. The position in Diagram 54 shows that the brilliant inspirations which form the basis of end game studies can also occur in practical play. White is a Bishop ahead and appears to have a won game. But it is Black's move. 1 R Kt 7 ch with a threat of mate, 2. R Qi All seems secure. The Queen's ability to inflict a mate in certain positions, in which a Rook could give check only, is worthy...

PQB BxBP

These examples of the Bishop's direct attack will suffice. It can occur in many ways and need not contain a check. For instance, with two black Knights at White's Q Kt 5 and Q 3, White can win one of them by playing a Bishop to K 2. White must look out for complications, e.g. if one of the Knights can give check on the next move, they are both saved. So if the Knights are on Q Kt 5 and Q B 4 one of them can move to White's Q 6 for mutual protection. Here the Bishop attacks a hostile piece, with...

The Knight

A unique and valuable characteristic of the Knight is its ability to attack any other piece without itself being in immediate danger from that piece. It follows that an attack by a Knight on two or more hostile units the Knight fork is one of the most dangerous weapons in the chessplayer's armoury. Diagram i shows the Knight fork in its most elementary form. The position there depicted could normally result only from gross carelessness on the part of Black, The subsequent diagrams, however,...