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K Kt4 39. K Ktr, P Kt5 40. PxP, PxP 41. K B8 42. K Kt3, Q KR8 43. R Q3, R R KB3, R Q8 45. P Kt3, R QB8 46. R B8 and Black won. In No, 34 Black obtains two Rooks on the 7th rank by sacrificing a pawn (one might well sacrifice more to obtain such an advantage), while in No. 35 Black begins by occupying his 5th rank, and when he has reduced all White's pieces to the defensive, he wins the game quickly on the 8th rank. No. 36 is a perfect illustration of the...

Centre Counter

This defence is reminiscent of the Centre Game, which we have already analysed, and it lias the same drawbacks. For though it is true that Black attacks the unprotected immsa mvi 1 ivt r 1 m 1 n 1 ir r m a mi i iw* 11 t mwvMSMMMi i n > > mini King's pawn with his defended pawn, the immediate exchange brings his Queen to the middle of the board with all the risks that such a sortie implies. We have already pointed them out in the Centre Game, Here White has the further advantage of the move,...

The Siesta Gambit

We have just seen that after P K4, P K4 z. Kt KB3, Kt QB3 3. B- Kts, P QR3 4. B R4, P Q3 White is more or less forced to continue with either 5. BxKtch or P G4. Among inferior continuations at W'hite's disposal there is one (5. P B3) which gives Black the opportunity of seizing the initiative in real gambit style. (This line is known as the Siesta Gambit and has been much played in recent years). The move 5- P B3 (played in order to recapture at Q4 with this pawn) contains no direct threat and...

No

Instead of struggling against a King-centre, Black fights the battle round his Queen-centre, where he can be more active. A glance at the two diagrams will show the profound difference between the two types of games. In the half-open games, White is naturally led to attack on the King's side, while Black operates on the Queen's side. It is just as if Black is effecting an enveloping movement, a manoeuvre well known in military strategy. Having first move sometimes becomes even a disadvantage....