Info

Q—b7

Kt X P d4

Euwe-Capablanca, 1931.

Euwe-Capablanca, 1931.

[Variation B]

1 P—d4

Kt—fö

2 P—c 4

P—e6

3 Kt—f3

P—b6

4 P—g3

B—b7

5 B—g2

P—c5

6 P—65

P x Pd5

7 Kt—h4

Q—c7

8 P x P 65

P—d6

White has a markedly superior position.

[Variation C]

1 P—64

Kt—f6

2 P—c4

P—e6

3 Kt—f3

P—b6

4 P—g3

B—b7

S B—g2

Q—c8

6 O—O

P—c5

7 P—b3

P x Pd4

8 B—b2

B—e7

9 Kt x P d4

B x Bg2

White has a markedly superior position.

[Variation D]

I P—d4

Kt—f6

2 P—c4

P—e6

3 Kt—f3

P—b6

4 P—g3

B—b7

5 B—g2

Q—c8

6 O—O

P—c5

7 P—65!

P x Pd5

8 P x P d5

Kt x P d5

White's free and open game is easily worth the Pawn sacrificed.

Nimzoindian Defense

If Black still intends to play an Indian defense, he must pin the Knight with:

(see next diagram)

The whole idea of the defense is to hold control of d5

and e4—and at the same time be able to challenge the Pawn at d4 by . . . P—c5 or . . . P—e5. The capture . . . P e6 X P d5 would spoil the second part of the plan.

7 B—d2

The pin on the Knight at c3 is relieved: the Queen at d5 is attacked, and e4 challenged.

If Black does not want to lose time by moving his Queen and later recapturing on c5 in reply to P X P c5, he must play:

This controls d4 and e5.

If 10 Kt—f5, Black must give up his other Bishop for the Knight—but he has gained time and center space. White's move attacks the square e5, and incidentally the Black Pawn which is on it.

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