T V Q Cittpg

The Rook sets out for the weakling, in preference to playing 27 g6xh5, after which there would come 28 Ra1-h1 Ke8-f8 29 RhlxhS, and White not only picks up the d-Pawn or the h-Pawn next move, but has set free his f-Pawn. The Rook seizes the open file, aiming to zoom up to the seventh rank. Black is helpless to prevent the invasion. If (a) 29 . . . Ke8-e7 30 Rh1-h7+ Rf6-f7 31 Bd3xg6 wins a Pawn, (b) 29 . . . Rf6-f7 30 Bd3xg6 pins The seventh rank, the ideal location for a Rook The Rook is in...

Lissitzin Capablanca 1935 Moscow

Capablanca Moscow, 1935 Lissitzin's early initiative lets him when an early advance of his put on pressure. This is augmented Queen-side minority of Pawns splits up Capablanca's Pawns, rendering them vulnerable to attack. Unfortunately for Lissitzin though, he loses the thread of the game, and misses his chance for glory. He lets Capablanca escape from the toils The ensuing endgame finds Capablanca in his element. Handling it with his usual cool efficiency, he...

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Black misses an opportunity to equalize by 13 Nc5xd3 14 Qd2xd3 Bc8-d7 15 0-0 Ra8-c8 16 Ra1-e1 Bd7-e8, as in the game played many years later Bhend-Christoffel, Zurich, 1961. Fixes his attention on the King Pawn, the only weakness in Black's position. Either an oversight strange as that might seem or a transposition of moves. The proper caper was 17 Nf3-e5, so that after 17 Nc6xe5 18 Re1xe5, the square d4 is made available for the remaining Knight who can reach it by way of b5 or e2. It would be...