S Kb Bb

22 4^b3 gb8 23 gc2 &c8 24 4^c3 Qd7 25 gdl ge6 26 gdcl gee8 27 cb6 ab6 28 bc6 £c6 29 deS ^eS 30 ^d4 i2,b7 31

8 #d2 d5 9 bc3 c4 10 ^.e2 e6 11 4^e5 ^e7 12 0-0 <£}d7 13 g4 4^f6 14f3 fg4 1S^g4^.d7 16

4>5 17 Üg3 gf8 18 f4 <£}f6 19 £f3 0-0-0 20 gfbl \$a6 21 a4- £e8 22 ^e2 £gb 23 hg6 24 gb5 gd7 25 gabl #c6 26 J2h4 ®b8 27 4>8 28 Üe7 ge7 29 e4 <£f6 30 edS ed5 31 £dS <£d5 32 gd5 gf4 33 #g3 gef7 34 Eft #d5 35 gf4 ®c8 36 gf7 #f7 37 We5 38 #e8 @c7 39 #e7 ®c6 40 #e8 ®b6 41 #d8 : Vz

Huss - King

Lucerne 1989

1 d4 e6 2 <£}f3 fS 3 ßgS Üe7 4 ^e7 #e7 5 <£c3 £}f6 6 g3 d6 7 £tg2 0-0 8 0-0 4>:6 9 d5 ed5 10 £>d5 £>d5 11 #d5 Qeb 12 #d2 gae8 13 b3 ®h8 14 c4

&f7 15 gfel ^h5 16 £>d4 17 f?d4 f4 18 £b7 c5 19 ^d5 &e2 20 £c6 &f6 21 #g2 f3 22 #h3 ge7 23 #g4 g6 24 h4 hS 25 #h3 a5 26 gacl @h7 27 gc2 @h6 28 gccl #d4 29

gc2 gf5 30 gccl gee5 31 Qd7 gf7 32 ^c6 #g4 33 #g4 hg4 34 gc2 g5 35 hS ©h5 36 gd2 gf6 37 a3 ge7 38 gb2 gfe6 39 b4 ab4 40 ab4 Üc4 41 ge6 ge6 42 b5 gel 43 ®h2 ge2 44 gbl gf2 45 ©gl Bg2 [email protected] gg3 47 b6 f2 48 £g2 gb3 49 gb3 Üb3 50 @[email protected] 0 : 1

Yusupov - Agdestein

VISA Challenge 1990

1 d4 e6 2 <£}f3 f5 3 d5 £jf6 4 de6 QcS 5 ed7 <£bd7 6 e3 #e7 7 £¡bd2 |>4 8 £>e4 fe4 9 <öd4 £>e5 10 4}b3 £d(> 11 <£g4 12 Üb5 @f8 13 Qe2 £f6 14 #dl #e5 15 ^d2 #g5 16 g3 Üh3 17 Qc3 @e7 18 ^?d4 ghd8 19 0-0-0 @f8 20 ^c4 Wgb 21 £>c5 bS 22 c6 23 #c4 4^d5 24 <^b7 gd7 25 £}d6 #d6 26 gd4 @g8 27 ghdl QfS 28 &b4 #f6 29 WcS gf7 30 ^c4 h(> 31 gd5 cd5 32 #d5 ge8 33 &c3 #e6 34 #b5 #c8 35 Qf7 @f7 36 gd6 ®g8 37 a4 ®h7 38 #d5 Ûg4 39 #d4 ge7 40 b3 #f5 41 #d2 gf7 42 ®b2 ^f2 43 #f2 Bf2 44 gd2 gf7 45 ^d4 ®g6 46 c4 £e6 47 gc2 gb7 48 @a3 a5 49 ^c3 ga7 50 gd2®fS51 gd6^g8 S2£d4 1 : 0

Benjamin - Machulsky New York Open 1990

0-0 df) 9 c3 h6 10 4^f3 Jle7 11 cd4 0-0 12 £}c3 e5 13 ^.c4 4 ©h7 14 ©hi £g4 \SQe3 gc8 16 de5 deS 17 £d5 £b4 18 h3 &f3 19 gf3 #e7 20 gel QcS 21 £ cS #c5 22 _Qe6 gcd8 23 <£d5 #d6 24 <£f6 gf6 25 #d6 gd6 26 gf6 gf6 27 .&c8 b6 28 £b7 <£b4 29 gc7 ©g6 30 £Lc8 ®g5 31 g3 f5 32 £f5 gd2 33 gf7 £)c2 34 h4 ©hS 35 gg7 <£e3 36 ^e6 gf2 37 &f7 gf7 38 gf7 ®g4 39 ©h2 a5 40 gf6 b5 41 gg6 ®f3 42 hS ©e4 43 ®h3 ®f5 44 g4 8 ®f4 45 gf6 ®g5 46 gf3 1 : 0

5 Other Irregular Anti-Dutch Systems

Other irregular Anti-Dutch systems

Notice 'systems' as opposed to 'moves'. White can play almost anything reasonable on his second move but I only consider ideas which have some interest.

h3l?

Rather deceptive. White intends to dismantle Black's control of e4 by playing g2 - g4. But the plan is slow and Black can whip up central counter-play.

2 ... dS! comes strongly into consideration. I remember a game Hebden -Elliot, Bradford 1988 which went 3 £f4 4}fb 4 £}f3 ei> S e3 £|d6 and White had next to nothing. Black just kept on challenging the grip on eS and preparing c7 - c5, e.g. ... <£bd7, ... #e7, ... b(> etc.

On top of this 2 ... dS 3 g4 is now unattractive, e.g. 3 ... fg4! 4 hg4 Jjg4 5 Qh3 Qh3 6 £h3 &c<>! A ... #d7, ... 0-0-0 and if Black doesn't wish to enter this murky line he can play 3 ... &f6, e.g. 4 gfS? &f5+ or 4

3 g4 fg4?l

3 ... d6 4 gS <^e4 5 &f4 eS!? 6 deS de5 7 #d8 ®d8 8 ñeS 4^g5 9 £c3 4jc6 10 0-0-0 £[d7 11 &h2± Partos.

5 e4 d6

Korchnoi - Kanel, Biel 1979. Despite being a pawn down White has more space and significant attacking chances. But 2 h3 has not been repeated probably because of 2 ... dS or 3 ... d5!

Contact the homicide department. Black must engage in self defence.

If Black declines, the idea has already succeeded, e.g. 2 ... d5 3 gS! stopping the knight from coming out and 2 ... d6 3 gfS £f5 4 £g2 c6 S e4 Qgb 6 <§>2± Bellin. A kind of Dutch - Grob.

3 h3

3 e4 eS!; 3 &gS <&f6! 4 <^c3 dS 5 #d3 c6! 6 0-0-0 g6 7 e4 4^e4 8 £y?4 de4 9 #e4 #dS! Bellin.

4 hg4 Jig 4

5 ... g6 6 Hh7 gh7 7 #g6 Hf7 8&g4£)f6 (8 ...,£>h6 9 #h5) 9 &g6± ^ &f3, £h3 P. Schmidt, Deutsche Schach-zeitung 19340.)

Thus gives Schwarz in his 1964 Hollandisch later repeated by Bellin and the claim is that Black should be able to consolidate.

We can analyse a little further, e.g.

i) 8 £}gS! (A 4}h7) 8 ... #d6! (A 9<^h7 0-0-0) 9£>c3 a6 and its not easy to see a good move for White given that Black is about to play e7 - eS, for instance 10 0-0-0 11 Sh3 Hh7 12 gh7 <£h7 13#h7<£d4+

ii) 8 <2>f4 (A 9 £)g5) 8 ... #d7 9 4^gS #g4! 10 e3 4>4! Il<£>e4 de4 12 #e4co iii) 8 <£}f4 #d7 A ... 0-0-0+

I wouldn't like to definitely say what's going on in the diagrammed position. With the threat of £>g5 everpresent White will always have some chances.

Perhaps a real man would like to try it out.

see following diagram

Alapin's idea.

Cutting the thought of 3 e4 right out. Others allow this freeing move or the

hackish 3 g4 although even this might be possible, e.g. 2 ... d6 3 g4 fg4 4 h3 g3 5 fg3 £>f6 6 £g2 (better was 6 e4) 6 ... <£)c6 7 e4 Peicheva -Al. Karpov USSR 1989 and now best is 7 ... eS with an unclear position.

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