Mm m m

Probably best because it forces White to sacrifice material if he wants to play for an advantage. Other moves are not so good, e.g.

4 ... h6? S &h4 cS 6 e4! cd4 7 #d4 de4 8 #d8 ®d8 9 0-0-0 &d7 10 fe4 g5 11 £el fe4 12 h4 Qg,7 13 hgS hgS 14 Sh8£h8 IS 4^h3 g4 16<£g5± Kovalev - Vikulov, USSR 1974.

4 ... c5 5 e4! de4 6 dc5! #a5 7 #d2 #cS 8 0-0-0 <£}c6 9 QbS Qeb 10 <£h3 a6 11 <2^f4± Veresov - Panov, USSR 1937. White has a terrific initiative.

4 ... e6. The only other sensible alternative, but ... 5 e4 Qe7 6 e5 <&fd7 7 £e7 #e7 8 <£b5 £}b6 9 c3 a6 10 4>3 0-0 11 Jld3 cS 12 Qe2 cd4 13 cd4± Rakic - Lomb-ardy, Maribor 1978. (13 ... £C6 14 £>c2 £b4 15 4^b4 #b4 16#d2± White continues to enjoy more space).

Less successful from White's point of view was 8 #d2 0-0 9 f4 c5 10 <£}bS <£}c6 11 £f3 <£b6 12 c3 £d7 13 ^d6 cd4 14 <^d4 <£}d4 15 #d4 £c6 16 £)c8 17 <^c8 gfc8= Iclicki - Winants, Brussels 1990 {Vi 38).

Even simpler is 4 ... eb S e4 &e7 6 ef5! efS 7 #d2 0-0 8 0-0-0± Hort - Unzicker, Amsterdam 1971.

5 e4 fe4 6 fe4 £>e4 7 <^e4 de4 8 d5 4^e5 is a Staunton.

5 e3.

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