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This is not a particularly well-explored position. 6 C|c4 appears logical but Black has two interesting replies:

i) 6 ... e5!? 7 deS (7 £}ge2? ed4 8 4^d4^g4+; 7 £gS ed4 8 4>4 #e7co) 7 ... ^dl 8 <£dl <£g4!=

ii) 6 ... <£)c6 7 £}ge2 e5!? 8 £g5! ed4! (8 ... ^d4 9 0-0 J^g4 10 #elf Maroja -Padevsky, Virovitica 1976) 9 <£e4 (9 &f6 #f6 10 <£>4 ^b4

11 c3 ^h4 12 <^2g3 dc3 13 bc3 ^,c3 with an attack) 9 ... i^b4 10 c3 dc3 11 <^4c3 ^dl

12 Sdl £}e4 and Black has the initiative (Kovacevic).

Notice the importance of the central counter e7 - e5 and the following counter-play on the dark squares.

I would hope that this analysis could be verified by an over the board trial but then who would take White?

We take this as the main line because it has been most recently played.

7 £|c4 is an alternative but I don't rate it. Black should build up a consistent attack against the d4 pawn, e.g. 7 ... 4^c6! 8 Qge2 #d7 9 0-0 e6! (but not 9 ... e5 10 $fb gf6 11 £}d5 .Qg7 12 gf5! Furman - Lutikov USSR 1950) I0#et

White could now try to jettison his weakness by 10 d5 ed5 11 <£}d5 but Black soon builds up the initiative, e.g. 11 ... 0-0-0! 12 <^f6 QcS 13 ©hi #d1 14 Hadl gdl 15 Sdl gf6 16 £f6 gf8+ Taimanov.

Therefore he prepares with 10 ^el, the transfer of his queen's rook to dl.

An old correspondence game shows the correct treatment for Black, e.g.

10 ... 0-0-0! 11 gdl 4>5! 12 £b5 c6 13 £a4 £}c4! In order to preserve his bishop White has let the Black knight into an active square. Schulz - Wille, Corres 1957 continued 14 d5 (14 Qb3 (!) 4>5 C14 ... 4^b2

15 gbl] 15 £}b3 16 ab3 J2Jb4!co) 14 ... jlcS 15 ©hi Qe3

16 dc6 #c7 and Black had good chances in this sharp position.

A final attempt to rely on development with 7 ^d2 ran up against 7 ... e6 8 h3 _Qd6 9 0-0-0 h6 10 £f6 #f6 H &c4 £>c6 12 <£^ge2 0-0-0 13 ghfl_^a5! 14 QbS #g5 15 <£f4 a6+ Arbakhov - Gleiz-erov, USSR 1984. Black's control of the centre eliminated any danger and he is now a sound pawn up.

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