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Black should have kept as many pieces on the board as he could, to reduce the role of White's queenside majority. A) After 29 fib5 30.fld5 Sxd5 31.fifxd5 < 4> e8 32.fic4 fic3 33.fixc3 Axe3 34.< 4> f3 > d7 35.4> e3 4> e6 36. d3 Ael 37.f4 Black would also suffer. White puts the pawn on the bishop's colour. Normally this should be avoided, but here it restricts the bishop Al) 37 < i> d5 38.a3f6 39.fie3+& c5

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White can try to go after Black's king with 33.We6 . However, this would require great alertness and precision. In his analysis of his best games, Karpov has corrected some of the commentators who assessed this position as winning for White. He also mentioned that with so little time left on the clock, it was impossible for Smejkal to play such a complicated position. The position is so complicated that a mistake, which changes the evaluation, also appeared in Karpov's analysis. After 33 g6...

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Ftacnik would have attained a draw by doing nothing, but he wants to force it Fixing the king at the edge of the board. 76 & h6 77.*d6 thU 78.& e7 4> h5 After 79.4> xf7 e5 80.< f6 - > h4 Black takes White's last pawn and his king and knight are not separated. 79 d5+ 80.4> e5 In case of 80.< 4> xf7 < & h4 81.2f3 e5 82.< 4> e6 e4 (82 tf4+ 83.4> xe5 < xh3 84.4> f5 is a bit shaky, but still a draw) 83.2f8 & c3 84.2c8 & dl 85. f5 xhS, Black holds. 80 < i h4...