PQR

AK: Warding off the possibility of a later . . . P-QN4. Having consolidated his centre, White is ready to proceed, after appropriate piece regrouping, with the storming of Black's K-side and centre. Not wanting to passively await events, Hubner endeavours to start play in the centre, but nothing comes of this.

24 N4-K2

AK: Having thought for 40 minutes, Hubner could find nothing better than to exchange queens and offer a draw. After the game

Hubner was in favour of 24 . . . N-B3, but 25 N-Q5 gives White an appreciable advantage.

25 PxP

26 RxQ

AK: It is clear that the draw is declined since the game had decisive significance for the award of the first board prize, and, besides that, I had enough foundation (purely in the chess sense) to continue the fight.

28 N-N3 P-N3 with 29 ... B-B3 and 30 . . . R-N2 to follow.

27 R-Ql K-Bl?! AK: During the game I thought that Black's best continuation was 27 . . . R-Kl 28 RxP N-R5 29 K-B2 NxB 30 KxN NxP 31 NxN P-B4 32 N2-B3 PxN+ 33 K-N4. But in that case also, White has the advantage.

RH: Better 27 . . . N-Bl!? with the idea 28 . . . N-K3.

AK: The only move - on 28 . . . K-K2 there follows 29 P-K5 PxP 30 RxR RxR 31 RxR.

29 K-B2 R/Q1-B1 AK: Essential-the threat was P-K5.

32 R1-Q2

AK: Preparing 33 N-B2. If 32 N-B2 then 32 . . . P-QN4 is unpleasant.

AK: A questionable decision. Of course White could have prevented this move by means of 33 P-R4, but... you see Black is adding many weaknesses on the K-side. Though, in all truth, Black's pieces do obtain the . . . K4 square.

36 B-Rl

AK: Defending against the threat of 36 . . . N-K4 and at the same time clearing the third rank for manoeuvres. 36 . . . R-Bl

RH: 36 ... N-K4 37 R-N3 R xR 38 P x R P-B4 39 N-Q4±

AK: Black was unable to appropriate the . . . K4 square, since that would have involved diverting the knight from the defence of. . . Q4.

39B-B3 RxR

40PxR R-K4

41 P-KN4 AK: The sealed move. It seems illogical, because the pawn advances on to a square of the same colour as the bishop, but in return White anchors the KB5 square and further hampers his opponent.

41 . . . P-QR4 AK: Relinquishing the struggle for . . . P-QN4 and putting the initiative completely in White's hands.

Truly Black's position is already very difficult, and in the event of him waiting passively, White will advance his QNP to QN5, then occupy Q5 with the knight at present on QB3, so that after the exchange the knight on K3 can attack Black's pawns from QB4 or KB5.

42 R-Ql

AK: 42 N-B5 is no good on account of 42 . . . NxN 43 NPxN BxB 44 KxB P-R4 45 N-Q5 N-N2! White waits for a more opportune moment and for the time being withdraws his rook to the empty first rank.

RH: 42 N-B5?! NxN 43 NPxN BxB 44 KxB P-R4 is unclear.

AK: A move earlier this move brought nothing because of 42 . . . NxN 43 BPxN B-R3. Now Black cannot capture the knight because of the unfortunate placing of the bishop.

RH: 43 . . . BxN44BPxB with 45 N-B4± ± to follow.

44N-B5 BxN

AK: The knight can no longer be endured. It would be bad to exchange the knight on . . . KB4 because of NP x N.

RH: 44 . . . B-Q2 45 R-KR1 K-Nl 46 K-N3 B-K3± 45 BP xB N-K2 46N-K3 AK: Directed towards QB4. 46 . . . N-Nl

AK: If 46 . . . N-KB3 47 N-B4 N x KP+ 48 K-N2 N-B6 49 N x R NxR 50 N-Q7+ K-Kl 51 N-B6+ and 52 B X N wins.

48 N xNP

AK: 48 P-K5 also gave a great advantage.

49N-B4 RxP

50R-QR1!

AK: In the ending the rook should be behind the passed pawn. There is no defence against 51 NxRP.

55 NxN PxN+

56 K-N3

AK: The rest is, as they say, a matter of technique. 56 ... N-Q3 57 K-B2 R-N7+ 58 K-Nl R-N2 59 P-R5 R-R2 60 P-R6 K-K2

AK: In the case of 60 . . . N-N2, White wins with 61 B-K2 N-B4 62 R-Nl NxKP 63 R-N7 R-Rl 64 P-R7 K-N2 65 R-B7. 61 K-B2 K-Q2 62 K-K3 N-B5+ 63 K-Q3 N-N3 64 B-K2 K-Q3 65 K-K3 N-Q2 66 R-Rl N-Bl 67 R-R6+ K-K2 68 P-Q6+ K-Ql 69 B-N5 R-Rl 70 R-R5 P-B3 71 R-R6 R-Nl 72 B-B6 R-N6+ 73 K-Q2 R-QR6 74 RxBP R R7 f 1-0

2209 AK-Peter Markland:

Sicilian

1 N-KB3 P-QB4 2 P-K4 N-QB3 3 P-Q4 PxP 4 NxP N-B3 5 N-QB3 P-Q3 6 B-KN5 B-Q2 7 Q-Q2 R-Bl 8 0-0-0 N xN 9 QxN Q-R4 10 B-Q2 P-QR3 11 P-B3 Q-QB4 12 Q-Q3 P-KN3 {242)

13 P-KN4 B-N2 14 P-KR4 It's a favourite tactic of Karpov to push up the K-side pawns, which usually results in the opening of attacking lines as well as weakening the opponent's defensive pawn formation. 14... P-R3 15 K-Nl B-K3 16 B-K3 Q-QR4 17 B-Q41 Even when Karpov is undertaking a K-side attack, he never seems to lose sight of the rest of the board - to be accurate, he tends to keep control over the whole position - see his games against Vujakovic and D. Byrne. 17 ... 0-0 18 Q-Q2! Threatening 19 N-Q5 and 18 . . . RxN 19 QxR QxP+ 20 K-Bl R-Bl 21 Q-R3 leads to (a) nothing for Black. 18 . . . N-Q2 19 N-Q5 QrQl 20 BxB KxB 21 N-K3 N-K4 22 B-K2! To play simply 23 P-KB4. Karpov's attack is simple, strong and deadly. 22 . . . P-B3 23 P-KB4 N-B5 24 BxN BxB 25 P-N5! Forcing the opening of lines to Black's king. 25 . . . RPxP 26 RPxP PxP This loses, but if 26 . . . R-KR1 or 26 . . . R-B2 then 27 PxP+, or 26 . . . B-Nl 27 QR-N1 and there is no real hope. 27 QrB3 + P-K4 28 NxB P-N4 29 PxKP RxN 30 Q-KR3! 1-0 Black is shattered: if 30 . . . R-Rl simply 31 Q X R + followed by capture of the QP, and if 30 . . . K-B2 31 Q-R7 + wins.

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