Mm

i tii

H fH All

m

BbB"»b

Other possibilities:

b) After 14 £)d5 exd5 15 exd5 <£)xd5 16 Wxg7 &d7 17 Wg4+ (17 Wxf7?Sde8) 17...&c7(17...&e8?! 18 &h6) 18 &xd5 ®xd5 19 Sxe7+ &b8 20 Wf3, White gets no more than a draw.

c) 14 a4!? b4 15 £kl5 exd5 16 Wxg7 r4>d7! (D) doesn' t promise White any advantage either:

This move of Magerramov's is aimed at transposing to positions similar to but slightly safer than the previous line.

cl) 17 Wxf7?! £>xe4!. c2) 17 exd5 £ixd5 18 Wg4+ (18 Wxf7? Sde8! 19 a5 £sc7) 18...<â>c7 19 ¿xd5 Wxd5 20 Sxe7+ &b8 21 ®f37! ®xf3 22 gxf3 Shg8+ 23 <à>fl a5!. c3) 17 a5 Wc5 18 exd5 and then: c31) 18...<&xd5 19 Wg4+ &c7! 20 £xd5 Wxd5 21 Sxe7+ <â>b8 22 Sxb7+ (not 22 «f3? Wxf3 23 gxf3 Shg8+ 24 ■4>fl ±c6!; 22 c4 bxc3 23 bxc3 Shg8 24c4Wc6!?) 22...Wxb7 23 Wd4! with compensation.

c32) 18...Shg8!?19®xf7Sde8 20 ®e6+ (20 i.e3? Wxd5!; 20 ±a4+? <S?c8!) 20...stic7 21 Ae3 ®b5 22 J.b6+ <S?b8 23 i.a4 Wxd5 (23...Wc4!?) 24 »xd5 Axd5 25 £.xe8 £xg2! =.

d) 14 ±g5 0-0 and then: dl) 15 £.h6 £>e8 16 Sadl (this is Line B221 but with White a tempo down) 16...<&h8 17 i.g5 (17 &cl £if6 18 Sd3 a5!) 17...±xg5 18 Wxg5 £tf6, etc.

d2) 15Sadl^h5(15...a5!?16i.h6 £ie8 17 Sd3 &h8 18 ¿g5 &xg5 19 ®xg5 ®f6 has also been played) 16 Wh4 ±xg5 17 ®xg5 £>f6 18 Sd3 h6 (18...^8 transposes to Line B221; 18...®c5!?) 19 Wh4 (19 Wd2!? is another idea) 19...Wc5 20 ®f4 (20 Sg3 <i>h7!) 20...Sd7 = Kudrin-Browne, USA Ch (Modesto) 1995. 14...0-0 (D)

15 Ah6

15 i.e3 ®d7 16 ild4 ±f6 17 £.xf6 <Sixf6 18 Sadl Sd7 19 Sd2 Sfd8 20 Sedl Wc5+ 21 «f2 $f8 = Lamour-eux-Renet, French Ch (Nantes) 1993. 15...£ie8 16 Sadl Or:

a) 16 <£se2 ®c5+ 17 <£>hl &f6 (17...<£>h8!?) 18 c3 È.e5 19 f4 i.f6 20

£kl4 «> Shtyrenkov-Magerramov, Smolensk 1991.

b) 16 <&hl &h8 (Short's 16...i.f6 is simpler) 17 jLg5 £.xg5 18 ®xg5 £>f6 19 Sadl (19 a4!? b4 20 £ldl) 19...Sd7 (19...#c5!?) 20 Sd3 Sfd8 21 Sedl (21 a4!?> 21...1rc5 22 We3 (22 Wd2!?) 22...&g8! with an equal position, Short-Kasparov, London PCA Wch (16) 1993.

16...iLf6 17 JLg5 (more interesting is 17 Sd3! a5 18 i.g5, Kissinger-Krue-ger, corr. 1999) 17...i.xg5 18 Wxg5 £tf6 19 Sd3 ®c5+ 20 ®e3 (Zapata-Mecking, San Jose do Rio Preto 1995) 20...Sd7 =.

17...£>f6 18 sfchl &h5 19 Wh4 i.xg5 20 Wxg5 £vf6 21 Sd4 h6 (Van Blitterswijk-Rowson, Wijk aan Zee 2000) 22 ®d2 is slightly better for White.

Now Mirumian-Kaufman, Olomouc 1999 continued 19 ®e3 Sd7 (alternatively, 19...^5 20 Sd3) 20 Sd3 Sfd8 21 Sedl ®c5 22 £ie2! ®xe3+ 23 Sxe3 &g8 24 a4, and Black still had some problems.

Generally speaking, White definitely appears to be more comfortable after 10 Wg3 £>c6 11 £ixc6 ®xc6 12 Sel i.b7! 13 a3 but Black's position has a reasonable safety margin. Alternatively, 13 ®xg7!? still seems to be risky for White.

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